Go Back   2020-2021 StudyChaCha > StudyChaCha Discussion Forum > General Topics > Vidyasagar university M.sc




Thread: Vidyasagar university M.sc Reply to Thread Vidyasagar university M.sc
Your Username: Click here to log in
Title:
  
Message:
Post Icons
You may choose an icon for your message from the following list:
 

Additional Options
Miscellaneous Options

Topic Review (Newest First)
May 24th, 2015 09:20 AM
bidyut mandal
Re: Vidyasagar university M.sc

I have done BA in Geography (H) Can you tell me when the university will start admission process in 2015?from where can I download application form for admission at Vidyasagar university and where submit it
May 24th, 2015 09:13 AM
bidyut mandal
Re: Vidyasagar university M.sc

I have done BA in Geography (H) Can you tell me when the university will start admission process in 2015?from where can I download application form for admission at Vidyasagar university and where submit it
April 9th, 2014 01:10 PM
Sashwat
Re: Vidyasagar university M.sc

Vidyasagar university was established on September 29, 1981. It offers courses at the undergraduate and post-graduate levels.

As you required for the Vidyasagar university M.sc geography syllabus, here I am sharing the same:

Geo-tectonics & Geomorphology
GROUP A: Oceanography
GROUP B: Hydrology
Climatology
Environment Study
Settlement Study
Population Study
Landuse Planning and Management
Resource Use & Management
GROUP A: Ground Survey
GROUP B: Aerial Photo-Interpretation
Quantitative methods in Geography
Geographical Thoughts
Regional Development & Multilevel Planning
Global Environmental Issues - pollution and Hazards
Political and Economic Geography
Elective Special Paper
Elective Special Paper
Elective Special Paper (Field study)
Remote Sensing and Geographic Information System
Computer applications – Numerical data processing
GROUP A:: Methodology Environmental Research
GROUP B:: Thematic Mapping of Environment

PART I PAPERS
PAPER-I (EXAMINATION TIME: 4 HOURS)
MODULE 1: GEO-TECTONICS & GEOMORPHOLOGY
Full Marks: 50. Number of lectures to be delivered for each module is 50. Pattern of setting questions: Four
questions of 15 marks (Group-A) and four questions of 10 marks (Group-B) are to be set. Two questions of
15 marks each and two questions of 10 marks each are to be answered. Each question is to have at least two
parts in Group-A. Right hand side parentheses indicate lecture hours.

Unit I (15)
1. Modern theories of the origin of the earth.
2. Study of the interior of the earth and the earth’s crust – Isostatic adjustments of the
earth’s crust
3. Plate Tectonics and Neo-tectonics.
4. Doctrine of Uniformitarianism.

Unit II (10)
1. Rock structure; Processes of weathering, mass-wasting and erosion and resultant
landforms.
2. Slope development and slope facets; Relationship between longitudinal and transverse
slope recession; Geomorphological processes upon slopes.
3. Concept of grade, profile of equilibrium and base level.

Unit III (10)
1. Evolution of landforms by the process – Fluvial, Glacial & Periglacial, Aeolian,
Karst and Coastal.
2. Landforms developed by the interruptions of the Fluvial Cycle.

Unit IV (15)
1. Concept of cycle of erosion (W.M. Davis, W. Penck and L.C. King). Landforms
associated with cycle of erosion.
2. Non-cyclic concept (Hack, Chorley and Schumm).
3. Applied geomorphology: Application of geomorphology in planning and development.

PAPER-I : MODULE 2
Full Marks: 50. Number of lectures to be delivered for each module is 50. Pattern of setting questions: Four
questions of 15 marks (Group-A) and four questions of 10 marks (Group-B) are to be set. Two questions of 15
marks each and two questions of 10 marks each are to be answered. Each question is to have at least two parts in
Group-A. Right hand side parentheses indicate lecture hours.

GROUP A- OCEANOGRAPHY (25)
Unit I (15)
1. Study of the continental and oceanic crusts – origin and permanency of the ocean basins.
2. Ocean waters – salinity and temperature and chemical compositions.
3. Air-sea interactions; Ocean circulations, dynamics of waves, tides and currents.
4. Marine ecosystem. Marine sediments – classification, distribution, texture and transport.

Unit II (10)
1. Onshore and Offshore oceanic regions
2. Geomorphology of coastal regions.
3. Coastal ecology – coastal dunes, mangroves and coral reefs.

MODULE 2: GROUP B – HYDROLOGY (25)
Unit I (15)
1. Hydrology – definition and relation with the environment.
2. Hydrological cycle, global and basin hydrology.
3. Estimation and measurement of hydrological parameters; softness and hardness, temperature,
salinity, alkalinity, pH.
4. Study of trace elements and dissolved gases in water.
5. Unit hydrograph and its application.

Unit II (10)
1. Ground water studies – concept of aquifers, depletion and recharge.
2. Concept of watershed and major watersheds in India.
3. Wetland Ecosystems.
4. Major wetlands of India and West Bengal.

PAPER-II : (EXAMINATION TIME: 4 HOURS)
MODULE-3: CLIMATOLOGY
Full Marks: 50. Number of lectures to be delivered for each module is 50. Pattern of setting questions:
Four questions of 15 marks (Group-A) and four questions of 10 marks (Group-B) are to be set. Two
questions of 15 marks each and two questions of 10 marks each are to be answered. Each question is to have
at least two parts in Group-A. Right hand side parentheses indicate lecture hours.

Unit I (40)
1. Introductory overview of climate (elements and factors)
– Climatology and Meteorology (15)
a. Sun – Radiation distribution & balance, Cooling & warming of terrestrial / aquatic surface
and atmosphere, Adiabatic heat transfer, Role in weather-making, Seasons
b. Atmosphere- composition, profile, its evolution through phases, greenhouse gases,
probing the atmosphere, atmospheric stability, lifting processes
c. Water- Hydrologic cycle and role in weather-making, latent heat of vaporisation, Bowen
ratio, humidity & saturation concept, poleward heat transport, Heat transport between
hemispheres
2. Study of Agro-meteorological features – temporal variation of rainfall, temperature,
humidity and wind, Methods of climatological measurements. Weather observatories
various elements- Thermometers, Barometers, Psychrometers, rainfall measuring devices
etc., Balloon-based measurements, Rocket-based measurements, Radiosonde, Pyranometer,
Modern-day satellite based measurements. (10)

3. Modern Climatological Concepts: Mechanism of wind developments – surface wind & upper
air circulations; Jet Streams; Planetary Circulations, mechanism of Monsoon; mechanism of
cloud formation, types of precipitation, theories relating to Mechanism of precipitation. (10)
4. Dynamics of Air masses and fronts – Tropical and Extra-tropical Cyclones: scales, genesis
and propagations. (5)
6

Unit II (10)
1. Climatic classifications –Trewartha and Stamp. (2)
2. Global climatic changes and Global warming (4)
3. ENSO phenomena. (4)

MODULE-4: ENVIRONMENT STUDY
Full Marks: 50. Number of lectures to be delivered for each module is 50. Pattern of setting questions: Four
questions of 15 marks (Group-A) and four questions of 10 marks (Group-B) are to be set. Two questions of 15
marks each and two questions of 10 marks each are to be answered. Each question is to have at least two parts in
Group-A. Right hand side parentheses indicate lecture lecture hours.

Unit I (20)
1. Definition environmental studies; Components of physical environment & their interrelations
2. Concept of ecosystems: components and structure of ecosystem; Major ecosystems of the
world.
3. Environmental degradation and manifestations – land, water (surface & ground) and air.
4. Concept of managed environmental systems: agricultural ecosystems, multipurpose river-valley
projects and urban areas.

Unit II (15)
1. Importance of socio-cultural environment for human welfare.
2. Components of socio-cultural environment.
3. Relationship between physical and socio-cultural problems.
Unit III (15)
1. Environment-development debate; Environmental movements: Chipko, Silent valley &
Narmada Bachao Andolan.
2. Environmental ethics; Concept of Sustainable Development.

PAPER-III (EXAMINATION TIME: 4 HOURS)
MODULE-5: SETTLEMENT STUDY
Full Marks: 50. Number of lectures to be delivered for each module is 50. Pattern of setting questions: Four
questions of 15 marks (Group-A) and four questions of 10 marks (Group-B) are to be set. Two questions of
15 marks each and two questions of 10 marks each are to be answered. Each question is to have at least two
parts in Group-A. Right hand side parentheses indicate lecture hours.

Unit I (15)
1. Theories of evolution of human settlement
2. Size and distributions with theoretical models
3. Settlement hierarchy: theories of Christaller and Losch; hierarchy of settlements in India,
primacy of cities.

Unit II (15)
1. Evolution and growth of rural settlements
2. Service centres and the nature of hierarchy.
3. Spatial distribution and dispersion.
4. House forms and types.

Unit III (20)
1. Morphological structures of cities.
2. Functional classification of urban centres.
3. Social area analysis of urban centres.
4. Conurbation, urban agglomeration and rural-urban fringe.

MODULE-6: POPULATION STUDY
Full Marks: 50. Number of lectures to be delivered for each module is 50. Pattern of setting questions: Four
questions of 15 marks (Group-A) and four questions of 10 marks (Group-B) are to be set. Two questions of 15
marks each and two questions of 10 marks each are to be answered. Each question is to have at least two parts in
Group-A. Right hand side parentheses indicate lecture hours.

Unit I (26)
1. Population Geography as distinct from demography; scope and contents.
2. Sources of population data, their nature and quality.
3. Population characteristics and composition: age, sex, education, religion, casts and tribes,
rural and urban, occupation, language (with spl. Ref. to India).
4. Theory of population dynamics – fertility, mortality, migration.
5. Factors determining population growth, distribution and density with spl. Ref. to India.
6. Migration : Types, patterns and streams of migration and controlling factors.

Unit II (12)
1. Theories of population growth – classical and modern theories.
2. Demographic transition and the problems of developed and developing countries.
3. Nutrition, fertility, morbidity and mortality with special reference to India.

Unit III (12)
1. India’s population policies.
2. Problems of displaced population.
3. Human development index and its components: the Indian scenario.

PAPER-IV (EXAMINATION TIME: 4 HOURS)
MODULE-7: LANDUSE PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT
Full Marks: 50. Number of lectures to be delivered for each module is 50. Pattern of setting questions: Four
questions of 15 marks (Group-A) and four questions of 10 marks (Group-B) are to be set. Two questions of
15 marks each and two questions of 10 marks each are to be answered. Each question is to have at least two
parts in Group-A. Right hand side parentheses indicate lecture hours.

Unit I (15)
1. Concept of Land and Land use: Factors governing land utilisation and causing changes in
land use pattern; Importance of soil as determinant of land use.
2. Principles of Land use: (after Graham, Lewis, Stamp and others) – Basic principles of land
use planning.
3. Land Reclamation: Land use and land in areas having Saline and Alkaline soils (case
studies of Sundarban and East Kolkata); Acidic soils; Desert soils and Mountain soils with
special reference to India

Unit II (15)
1. Ownership, occupancy and government control on Landuse.
2. Landuse and govt. policy regarding wetland, urban land, industrial areas, mining and river
valley planning; concept of wasteland and objectives of National Wasteland Development
Board (NWDB)
3. Objectives, principles, types and methods of land use survey.

Unit III (20)
1. 1. Environmental Impact of land use changes: Impact of changes in the urban and rural
sectors with special reference to West Bengal.
2. Land use Planning Techniques and Methods; Land use Planning in the Urban and Rural
sectors.
3. Land classification (USDA, UK, FAO and India).
4. Landuse planning in India: a historical overview.

MODULE-8: RESOURCES USE AND MANAGEMENT
Full Marks: 50. Number of lectures to be delivered for each module is 50. Pattern of setting questions: Four
questions of 15 marks (Group-A) and four questions of 10 marks (Group-B) are to be set. Two questions of
15 marks each and two questions of 10 marks each are to be answered. Each question is to have at least two
parts in Group-A. Right hand side parentheses indicate lecture hours.

Unit I (8)
1. Concept of resource as related to economic, technological and cultural development stages.
2. Classification of resources according to biogenesis, renewability, availability and
distribution conditions. Distinction between diversity and disparity.

Unit II (12)
1. Pattern and use of major resources.
2. Land resources: use and misuse, protective measures to check soil erosion.
3. Water resources: domestic and industrial use, use in irrigation and water transport, hazards
associated with unscientific use.
4. Marine resources: minerals, fishes, planktons etc., multilevel development, hazards from
pollution.

Unit III (8)
1. Forest resources: patterns of existing use and misuse, regeneration through social forestry and
joint forest management.
2. Agricultural resources: necessity for establishing parity to meet the nutritional requirements of
the world population and supply raw materials for the industries, conventional and alternative
methods of production.

Unit IV (12)
1. Mineral resources: techniques of maintaining the reserve level by scientific conservation
and recycling processes.
2. Energy resources: disparities in production and consumption, necessity for increasing
reliance from conventional to non-conventional sources.
3. Industrial resources: linkages with other resource bases, inter-regional transfer of
technology, social adaptation of technology.

Unit V (10)
1. Human resource development and patterns of use. Disparities in development between the
developed and developing countries. Disparities arising from internal and international
policies.
2. Conservation and management needs: need for focusing the methods and measures of
conservation for benefit of all, need for assuring economic, and social and environmental
sustainability.

PAPER-V (PRACTICAL)
Module-9: GROUND SURVEY AND AERIAL PHOTO INTERPRETATION
Full Marks: 50. At least even number of periods to be assigned (preferably in batches) for Group-A and Group-B.
Examination Time: 4 hours. Pattern of setting questions: compulsory questions are to be set from Group-A (20
marks) and Goup-B (20 marks). 10 marks are to be allocated for Evaluation of Practical Notebook (5 marks) and
Viva-voce (5 marks). Right hand side parentheses indicate lecture / demonstration hours.

GROUP-A: GROUND SURVEY (20)
1. Contour Survey on the basis of leveling by Dumpy Level and Prismatic Compass.
2. Traverse Survey by i) Plane Table (Intersection Method) and ii) Prismatic Compass.
3. Determination of height by Transit Theodolite (Base Inaccessible method).
4. Survey of roads in a study area by a GPS handset and preparation of a road map.

GROUP-B: AERIAL PHOTO INTERPRETATION (20)
1. Advantages of Aerial photographs over conventional on-the-ground observations, Types,
scales and ground coverage, Basic Negative-to-Positive Photographic Sequence, Black &
White Films, Colour Films
2. Aerial cameras, film exposures (numerical problems), stereoscopy, pseudoscopy, lens
stereoscope, Mirror stereoscope, image parallax and determination of height.
3. Air Photo Interpretation; shape, size, pattern, tone, texture, shadows and site. Monoscopic
and stereoscopic Interpretation of airphotos for geomorphic land use features

PRACTICAL NOTEBOOK AND VIVA-VOCE (10)
MODULE 10: QUANTITATIVE METHODS IN GEOGRAPHY
Full Marks: 50. At least even number of periods to be assigned (preferably in batches). Examination Time: 4 hours.
Pattern of setting questions: Compulsory questions are to be set for 40 marks. 10 marks are to be allocated for
Evaluation of Practical Notebook (5 marks) and Viva-voce (5 marks). Right hand side parentheses indicate lecture /
demonstration hours.
1. Sampling and summarising data; Sampling Methods, Estimate from Samples, Sample size.
Frequency distribution, Lorenz Curve, Ternary Diagram, Weaver's Combination Index. (15)
2. Probability distributions: Probability, Law of Multiplication, probability distributions,
binomial distributions, normal probability distribution, properties of normal curve. (8)
3. Bi-variate distribution and correlation: Scatter diagrams, Regression lines and residuals.
Product moment correlation, Spearman’s Rank Correlation and Correlation Matrix. (7)
4. Comparisons and Hypothesis Tests: a) Comparisons - the Nearest Neighbour Analysis,
Shortest path analysis, b) Hypothesis Tests – X2 test, Student’s t-test (10)
PRACTICAL NOTEBOOK AND VIVA-VOCE (10)

PAR T I I PAPERS
PAPER-VI (EXAMINATION TIME: 4 HOURS)
MODULE-11: GEOGRAPHICAL THOUGHTS
Full Marks: 50. Number of lectures to be delivered for each module is 50. Pattern of setting questions: Four
questions of 15 marks (Group-A) and four questions of 10 marks (Group-B) are to be set. Two questions of
15 marks each and two questions of 10 marks each are to be answered. Each question is to have at least two
parts in Group-A. Right hand side parentheses indicate lecture hours.
Unit I (5)
The Field of Geography; its place in the classification of sciences vis-à-vis other
disciplines; geography as a social science, Physical and Human geography
Unit II (10)
Dualisms and dichotomies in geography:, Determinism and Possibilism, Systematic
(Nomothetic) & Regional (Ideographic) geography. Relationship between systematic
sciences and regional geography, Environmental determinism, possibilism and
ecological approach.
Unit III (25)
Laws theories and models; Encyclopaedism and to positivism, Development of
Behavioural Geography, Development of Critical Social Geography – Radicalism,
Welfare Geography and Gender issues, Post Modernism in Geography, Quantitative
Revolution and Geographic Information System
Unit IV (10)
Concept of Space in geography – Material space and Social space

MODULE-12: REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT & MULTILEVEL PLANNING
Full Marks: 50. Number of lectures to be delivered for each module is 50. Pattern of setting questions: Four
questions of 15 marks (Group-A) and four questions of 10 marks (Group-B) are to be set. Two questions of
15 marks each and two questions of 10 marks each are to be answered. Each question is to have at least two
parts in Group-A. Right hand side parentheses indicate lecture hours.
Unit I (30)
1. Definition & typology - formal-functional, nodal, uniform, single purpose, special
purpose & composite regions and hierarchy of regions.
2. Historical review of regional approach in geography – different countries.
3. Formal Regions: physiographic, agro-climatic and cultural. (spl. ref to India) – Functional
Regions in India: city region, industrial region, and administrative regions – Special
Purpose Regions: river valley, micro-watershed, metropolitan – Problem Regions: hilly
regions, coastal regions, tribal, drought-prone & flood-affected regions.
4. Regional development strategies: centralized & decentralized, multi-level planning
(rural/urban) peoples participation (Panchayati Raj institutions).
11
Unit II (20)
1. Structure of underdevelopment – colonial and post-colonial India.
2. Delineation of planning region in the national context, indicators of development and
their data sources, measuring levels for regional development & disparities.
3. Regional disparities in India: demographic and economic disparities.
4. Assessment of Regional Development Policies in India – problems and prospects.

PAPER-VIII
MODULE-13: GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES
- POLLUTION AND HAZARDS
Full Marks: 50. Number of lectures to be delivered for each module is 50. Pattern of setting questions: Four
questions of 15 marks (Group-A) and four questions of 10 marks (Group-B) are to be set. Two questions of 15
marks each and two questions of 10 marks each are to be answered. Each question is to have at least two parts in
Group-A. Right hand side parentheses indicate lecture hours.
Unit I (22)
1. Population growth Technology and Environment.
2. Rapid urbanisation-global economic pressures-scarcity of natural resources – Global
resources crisis.
3. Hazard in the environment: Concept of Hazard, Vulnerability and Disaster
4. Dimensions of disaster, risk assessment and causes, effects and loss sharing adjustments
of typical hazards:
a. Tectonic hazards - Earthquake
b. Geomorphological hazards – Landslides and River bank erosion
c. Hydrological hazards – Flood and Drought
d. Bio-physical hazards - Epidemics
e. Technological hazards – Industrial accidents and nuclear radiation leakage
f. Social hazards – Poverty & Crime
Unit II (10)
1. Global concerns: Global warming and its various implications, Acid rain and Ozone
depletion
2. Non-degradable waste and its disposal.
3. Pollution: Air, water, land, noise.
4. Soil degradation: Erosion, Salinisation, Alkalinisation, Desertification and Deforestation,
Quarrying & Mining
Unit III (8)
1. Pollution control strategies.
2. Recycling, renewable energy uses.
3. Conservation of Biodiversity with special reference to India (problems of agricultural
development and regeneration of forest and maintenance of Biodiversity –Wild, Aquatic
& Agriculture
Unit IV (10)
1. Environmental Policy
2. Legislation on Water, Air, Noise, Environmental Protection Act with special reference to
Legislation in India.
3. Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA).
4. Environmental Management Planning (EMP).

MODULE-14: Political and Economic Geography
Full Marks: 50. Number of lectures to be delivered for each module is 50. Pattern of setting questions: Four
questions of 15 marks (Group-A) and four questions of 10 marks (Group-B) are to be set. Two questions of
15 marks each and two questions of 10 marks each are to be answered. Each question is to have at least two
parts in Group-A. Right hand side parentheses indicate lecture hours.
Unit-I (20)
1. Geographical perspective on formation of state, nation and nation-state, core and
peripheral areas, capitals, frontiers and boundaries, border lands and buffer zones, buffer
states, land locked nation
2. Geostrategic views- Heartland and Rimland theories
3. Politics of world resources with special reference to energy resources, economic,
political, military blocks; political geography of foreign trade.
Unit-II (6)
1. Partition of India and its implication
2. Reorganization of Indian states since independence.
3. International and interstate water dispute in Indian subcontinent.
Unit-III (15)
1. Economic geography in the era of globalisation- agriculture, industry and trade.
2. Ranking of world economies
3. Significance of trade in regional and national economy; balance of payment and
international trade - GATT, WTO and Intellectual Property Right; Impact of
privatisation and liberalisation.
Unit-IV (9)
1. Concept of distance, accessibility and connectivity: Inter-regional and Intra-regional.
2. Modes of transportation and transport costs: comparative cost advantages.
3. Impact of Information Technology on trade.

PAPER-VIII SPECIAL PAPER THEORY : (ANY ONE)
1) Advanced Agricultural Geography and Advanced Pedology, 2) Coastal Management, 3)
Regional and Urban Planning, 4) Remote Sensing & GIS, and 5) Rural Development
Option-1 Advanced Agricultural Geography and Advanced Pedology
MODULE-15
Full Marks: 50. Number of lectures to be delivered for each module is 50. Pattern of setting questions: Four
questions of 15 marks (Group-A) and four questions of 10 marks (Group-B) are to be set. Two questions of
15 marks each and two questions of 10 marks each are to be answered. Each question is to have at least two
parts in Group-A. Right hand side parentheses indicate lecture hours.

Advanced Agricultural Geography (50)
UNIT:I AGRICULTURE IN INDIA (15)
1. Landuse pattern and regional pattern of productivity in India.
13
2. Green revolution, shifting cultivation, wasteland development, fodder culture and
white revolution—their impact and consequences.
3. Indian agricultural policies, management and planning.

UNIT:II DETERMINANTS AND PRINCIPLES OF AGRICULTURAL LANDUSE (15)
1. Determinants of agricultural landuse: Physical, economic, social and technological.
2. Cropping pattern, crop concentration, degree of commercialisation, diversification and
specialisation, efficiency and productivity, crop-combination region and agricultural
development.
3. Agricultural development: Pattern in developed and developing countries.
UNIT:III EMERGING ISSUES (20)
1. Food security: Monitoring performance of major crops of India for forecasting
production – Acreage & Yield estimation by Remote Sensing
2. Environmental impact of irrigation, fertilisers, pesticides, and technological knowhow.
3. Employment in agricultural sector: land-less labours, workers, children, occupational
health and agricultural activity.
4. Precision Farming – Use of modern technology: Remote Sensing, GIS & GPS

MODULE-16
Full Marks: 50. Number of lectures to be delivered for each module is 50. Pattern of setting questions: Four
questions of 15 marks (Group-A) and four questions of 10 marks (Group-B) are to be set. Two questions of
15 marks each and two questions of 10 marks each are to be answered. Each question is to have at least two
parts in Group-A. Right hand side parentheses indicate lecture hours.

ADVANCED PEDOLOGY (50)
UNIT:I CONSTITUENTS AND PROPERTIES OF SOIL INFLUENCING PLANT GROWTH (20)
1. Soil reactions: Soil acidity, alkalinity, salinity and their effects on plant growth.
2. Soil plasma: Organic and Inorganic origin, constitution, properties and types of soil
clay. Classification of clay minerals.
3. Soil nutrients: Macro- and micro-nutrients, nutrient transformation and fixation in soil.
Principle of base exchange and its relation with fertility.
4. Soil fertility and productivity: Roles of irrigation, inorganic fertilizers, organic
manures, including other bio-fertilisers in augmenting soil fertility. Nitrification and
denitrification.

UNIT:II SOIL GENESIS, SURVEY, CLASSIFICATION AND MANAGEMENT (10)
1. Processes of soil formation and soil development: Physical, Chemical, Flora, Fauna,
Climate, Relief, Time.
2. Pedogenic processes - Theories on formation of major soils of the world: podsolisation,
laterisation, lessivage, calcification, gleisation etc.. Sub-types of major zonal soils.
3. Soil degradation: factors, processes, and resultant forms in different parts of India.

UNIT:III MODERN TRENDS (20)
1. Classification of soil: Soil Taxonomy
2. Generation of derivatives: Land capability, land irrigability, soil irrigability, soil
suitability, hydrological grouping of soils
3. Role of Remote Sensing in soil mapping – Prospects & limitations
4. Integrated soil and water management – concept of sustainable development

Option-2 Coastal Management
MODULE-15
Full Marks: 50. Number of lectures to be delivered for each module is 50. Pattern of setting questions: Four
questions of 15 marks (Group-A) and four questions of 10 marks (Group-B) are to be set. Two questions of
15 marks each and two questions of 10 marks each are to be answered. Each question is to have at least two
parts in Group-A. Right hand side parentheses indicate lecture hours.

Coastal Management: Physical Aspects [50 marks]
Definition of coastal zone and related nomenclature.
Coastal processes: Wave, tide and wind. Coastal currents and cells.
Coastal morphodynamics: Micro, macro and biogenic forms. Systems of change in coasts: cyclical
and progressive. Classification of coasts based on processes and sediment characteristics.
Coastal biogeography with special reference to sea weeds, mangroves, dune vegetation and corals.
Their ecological and economic significance.
Natural coastal hazards and their management: Sea level rise, erosion, sedimentation and tropical
cyclones.
Techniques of monitoring changes in coastal processes and landforms.

MODULE-16
Full Marks: 50. Number of lectures to be delivered for each module is 50. Pattern of setting questions: Four
questions of 15 marks (Group-A) and four questions of 10 marks (Group-B) are to be set. Two questions of
15 marks each and two questions of 10 marks each are to be answered. Each question is to have at least two
parts in Group-A. Right hand side parentheses indicate lecture hours.

Coastal Management: Human Aspects [50 marks]
Coastal regulations with special reference to India.
Human utilisation of coasts, environmental impacts and management: Navigation, mining, fishing
and fish-processing, off-shore oil exploitation, reclamation and tourism.
Coastal engineering and its impacts: Ports and harbours, measures for prevention of erosion and
sedimentation.
Coastal pollution: Sources, impacts and management.
Integrated Coastal Management: Concepts, techniques and applications.
West Bengal coast: Major environmental issues, problems and their management
Application of Remote Sensing with special reference to Fishery
Monitoring Surface waters in Coastal Regulatory Zone (CRZ)
Study of Suspended mineral in water
Study of Chlorophyll in water
Measurement of Sea Surface Temperature (SST)

Option-3 Regional and Urban Planning
MODULE-15
Full Marks: 50. Number of lectures to be delivered for each module is 50. Pattern of setting questions: Four
questions of 15 marks (Group-A) and four questions of 10 marks (Group-B) are to be set. Two questions of
15 marks each and two questions of 10 marks each are to be answered. Each question is to have at least two
parts in Group-A. Right hand side parentheses indicate lecture hours.

REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT (50)
1. Concept of growth, development, poverty and underdevelopment
2. Regional development perspectives: Colonial period (Dependency theories)
3. Growth Pole theories and the developing world
4. Agropolitan Development, Basic Needs Approach
5. Regional Planning Strategies: regional plans of developed & developing countries.
Regional plans in India with examples.
6. Regional Environmental Issues.

MODULE-16
Full Marks: 50. Number of lectures to be delivered for each module is 50. Pattern of setting questions: Four
questions of 15 marks (Group-A) and four questions of 10 marks (Group-B) are to be set. Two questions of
15 marks each and two questions of 10 marks each are to be answered. Each question is to have at least two
parts in Group-A. Right hand side parentheses indicate lecture hours.

URBAN GEOGRAPHY (50)
1. Concepts and definitions: urban, urbanization and urbanism,
2. Origin & growth of urban settlements; bases & process of urbanisation
3. Major influences in urban planning: ancient, oriental, European, American.
4. Urbanization in India: a historical perspective
5. Features of metropolitan development (with special reference to India)
6. Urban Economy: basic, non-basic functions, changing urban functions; role of informal
sector
7. Issues of urban environment: poverty, crime, infrastructure, sprawl, renewal, pollution &
health.
8. Urban Environmental Problems in West Bengal
9. Brief introduction of Remote Sensing applications on Urban landscape

Option-4 Remote Sensing (RS) & Geographic Information
System(GIS)
MODULE-15
Full Marks: 50. Number of lectures to be delivered for each module is 50. Pattern of setting questions: Four
questions of 15 marks (Group-A) and four questions of 10 marks (Group-B) are to be set. Two questions of
15 marks each and two questions of 10 marks each are to be answered. Each question is to have at least two
parts in Group-A. Right hand side parentheses indicate lecture hours.

BASIC CONCEPTS (50)
Physics of Remote Sensing `(10)
Fundamental laws governing the science - Sources of Energy, Electromagnetic Radiation,
Radiation laws, (Wavelength-frequency-energy relationship of EMR, Stefan-Boltzman law,
Wien’s law, Kirchhoff’s law etc., numerical problems), Definitions, Requirements, Stages, Black
body and Real body, Radiant temperature & Kinetic temperature, Atmospheric interaction.

Satellite Platforms and Sensors (15)
Basics – Kepler’s laws, Major-Semimajor axis & Eccentricity, Velocity, Period (Numerical
problems), Historical development, Launch Vehicle, Indian scenario,
Types of platform for civilian applications, Advantages and Disadvantages, Characteristics of
various satellite platforms Physical principles and characteristics of major sensors, Resolution,
Data storage, dissemination & Processing, Ideal Remote Sensing system & Real Remote Sensing
System.

Aerial Photography & Photogrammetry (10)
Historical development, Definitions of key terminology, Types of aerial photographs, Geometry
of Single Aerial Photographs, Scale, Lens distortions, Relief distortion and Tilt distortions,
Rectification, Ortho Rectification, Film density & Characteristic curve, Colour Infrared films,
Film resolution, Filters, Stereo Photogrammetry – Various photogrammetric activities,
Conditions for Stereovision, Photographic overlap, Image Parallax, Flight Planning.

4. Satellite Systems (15)
Whiskbroom Systems: LANDSAT series
Pushbroom Systems: SPOT, IRS series
Microwave Systems: ERS, RADARSAT
Coarse resolution / Meteorological Satellite System: NOAA, INSAT
Very high resolution Remote Sensing Systems: Earlybird and Quickbird, IKONOS, Orbview-3, 4.

MODULE-16
Full Marks: 50. Number of lectures to be delivered for each module is 50. Pattern of setting questions: Four
questions of 15 marks (Group-A) and four questions of 10 marks (Group-B) are to be set. Two questions of
15 marks each and two questions of 10 marks each are to be answered. Each question is to have at least two
parts in Group-A. Right hand side parentheses indicate lecture hours.

Advanced techniques & applications (50)
1. A brief introduction to Thermal Remote Sensing (3)
Fundamentals of Thermal Remote Sensing: Sensing Radiant Temperature, Black body
Radiation, Radiation from real materials, sensors, utility
2. Microwave Remote sensing / Laser (5)
Concept, Advantages and Disadvantages vis-à-vis Optical systems, Spatial resolutions, Real
aperture and Synthetic aperture Radar, stereoscopy, parallax, passive systems, Lidar
3. A brief introduction to Hyperspectral Remote Sensing (2)
Concept, sensors, utility
4. Digital Image Processing (10)
Preprocessing / Georeferencing, Data enhancement, Density slicing, Data compression, Spectral
pattern recognition (Supervised, Unsupervised, NDVI etc.), Filtering, Output generation

5. Geographic Information System (10)
Basic Concepts: An overview of the development of the GIS field, Data Sources, Data capture
(Manual and automatic digitization of analog data), vector and raster structures, Hardware
configuration and software requirements, DBMS, Data Storage, Data analysis (overlay, buffering
etc), Data output, Query of a GIS
Introduction to ARC/INFO GIS software – a leading commercial software
Integration of GIS and Remote Sensing with a couple of case studies
6. Basic Theory of GPS Surveying (5)
Conceptual framework, Space segment, Ground segment, Control segment, Satellite
Triangulation, US Dept. of Defense policy, DGPS, Uses
7. Applications of Remote Sensing (15)
Comparative assessment of SOI toposheet, Aerial photograph and Satellite data for representation
of geographical data.
Remote Sensing in Landuse /land cover applications
Remote Sensing in Soil & Agricultural Applications
Remote Sensing in Geomorphic Mapping
Remote Sensing in watershed management

Option-5 Rural Development
MODULE-15
Full Marks: 50. Number of lectures to be delivered for each module is 50. Pattern of setting questions: Four
questions of 15 marks (Group-A) and four questions of 10 marks (Group-B) are to be set. Two questions of
15 marks each and two questions of 10 marks each are to answered. Each question is to have at least two
parts in Group-A. Right hand side parentheses indicate lecture hours.
Identification and Characteristics of Rural Environment (50)
1. Theoretical framework of rural development and geographical perspective: Rural
economy under different production systems – experiences of developed and developing
world with examples.
2. Dimensions of rural economy; Non-urban landuse – agriculture and complementary uses
of land; animal husbandry, dairying, poultry, fishing, forestry, market gardening and
agro-based industries; Problems of development related to labour, capital, market, scale
and infrastructure.
3. Rural labour force with special reference to gender, migration and socio-cultural
dimensions.
4. Analysis of rural settlement: Cause and effect associations, distribution of rural
settlement with special reference to size and spacing.; Rural service centres – Nature and
hierarchy of nodal settlement of market centres and growth centres – Central Place
Theory – Concept of rural urban continuum.

MODULE-16
Full Marks: 50. Number of lectures to be delivered for each module is 50. Pattern of setting questions: Four
questions of 15 marks (Group-A) and four questions of 10 marks (Group-B) are to be set. Two questions of
15 marks each and two questions of 10 marks each are to be answered. Each question is to have at least two
parts in Group-A. Right hand side parentheses indicate lecture hours.
Evolution of Rural Development in India (50)
1. Evolution of rural development concept in India; R.D. during plan periods – Objectives
and approaches.
2. Land reform in India – Abolition of Jamindari system, Land Ceiling Act and emerging
production relations.
3. Concept of Panchayati Raj – Role of Panchayati Raj in rural development and planning.
4. Objectives and strategies of planning at district, block and village levels; people’s
participation in rural development and planning; centrally sponsored programmes of rural
development: Area approach, Target Group approach and Target Sector approach.
5. Models of rural development: experience of Punjab, Kerala, West Bengal and Bihar.
PAPER-IX – PRACTICAL
MODULE-17 (SPECIAL PAPER FIELD - PRACTICAL) :
Field Report on Special Paper
(Report preparation: 25 Marks, Viva-voce: 25 Marks; Total: 50 marks)
Full Marks: 50. At least even number of periods to be assigned (preferably in batches). Examination Time: 4 hours.
Pattern of setting questions: Optional ( if any, compulsory questions are to be set).
Option-1: Advanced Agricultural Geography & Advanced Pedology (Field Report on a
specific project selected from the themes mentioned below)
1. Monitoring performance of major crops of a block in a particular season for
forecasting production – Crop Acreage & Production estimation (CAPE) by
Remote Sensing using SAC (Space Application Centre, ISRO, Ahmedabad)
methodology
2. Analysis of crop suitability in the study area based on the soil category, climate
and the available resources / technological inputs using GIS
3. Mapping of seasonal / round the year crop distribution of a specific study area
with the help of toposheet, satellite FCC and field traverse.
4. Mapping of soil categories from FCC by visual interpretation and finalization of
categories by field traversing and profile sample studies.
Option-2: Coastal Management (Field Report on Non-riverine Coastal Environments)
1. Mapping of the forms of coastline changes (non-riverine).
2. Demographic changes along with the coasts based on Census data.
3. Analysis of one specific problem based on field observation and primary survey with a
prepared questionnaire.

Option-3: Regional and Urban Planning (Field Report on a specific problem of an
urban area, e.g. Small town or a few wards of a big city, based mainly on primary data)
1. Identification of Study area and problem.
2. Data base, preparation of questionnaire, field survey, analyses of the survey data and
Mapping

Option-4: Remote Sensing & GIS (Field Report on a specific project selected from
the themes mentioned below)
1. Remote Sensing in Earth Sciences
Geomorphic Mapping: Visual interpretation of landforms, Basic concepts, Recognition
elements, Interpretation of drainage pattern, erosion and deposition landforms

2. Remote Sensing in Agricultural Applications
Soils Mapping, Crop mapping /Crop stress determination
3. Remote Sensing in Land and Water Management
Land use /Land cover planning, Land resources management
Water Resources: Surface water-ground water, water deciphering, quality inventory and
monitoring, quantity assessment
Watershed Management: Morphometric Analysis, Hydro-morphogeologic interpretation
techniques for targeting ground water potential zones in alluvial, sedimentary and hard
rock areas, flood Assessment and watershed Management.
4. Remote Sensing in Forest Management
Forest density mapping, Forest type mapping
5. Remote Sensing in Urban and Rural Development
Mapping of human habitation, type
6. Remote Sensing in Coastal Management
Coastal land use, spatial and temporal changes, SST, Phytoplankton assessment,
Sediment assessment
Option-5: Rural Development (Field Report on a specific problem of a defined rural
area, e.g. Micro-Watershed / Block Level / Mouza Level, based mainly on primary data)
1. Identification of Study area and problem.
2. Data base, field observation and survey (with a prepared questionnaire), analyses of
the survey data and mapping

MODULE-18
Full Marks: 50. At least even number of periods to be assigned (preferably in batches). Examination Time: 4 hours.
Pattern of setting questions: Compulsory questions are to be set for 40 marks. 10 marks are to be allocated for
Evaluation of Practical Notebook (5 marks) and Viva-voce (5 marks). Right hand side parentheses indicate lecture
hours.

Group-A: Remote Sensing (RS) (25)
1. Historical development of Remote Sensing as a technology, relevance of Remote Sensing
in Geography, Concepts and basic requirements
2. Satellite remote sensing: Platforms & Sensors, orbital characteristics, Whiskbroom
scanners, Pushbroom scanners, and data products.

3. Image Processing: visual and digital; Significance of secondary / in-situ data, Ground
Truth Verification. Preprocessing / Rectification and restoration; data enhancement,
Spectral pattern recognition, microwave sensing: SLAR Imageries, elements of passive
microwave sensing.
4. Remote Sensing applications and mapping in India – Case studies (e.g., Landuse
planning, forest management, wasteland management etc.)
Group-B: Geographical Information System (GIS) (15)
1. Concept of GIS, maps & spatial information, dynamics and selection of spatial
information, concept of spatial and non-spatial data, computer environment for GIS
(hardware & software requirement)
2. Spatial data: raster-vector structure- conversion & comparison
3. Elements of GIS: data capture, verification & processing, storage & maintenance, data
manipulation, analysis, overlay analysis.
4. Integration of GIS, remote sensing and GPS data.
5. Application: use of satellite imagery and other categories of maps for GIS (e.g., Landuse
planning, forest management, wasteland management etc.)

PRACTICAL NOTEBOOK AND VIVA-VOCE (10)
PAPER-X - PRACTICAL
MODULE-19
Full Marks: 50. At least even number of periods to be assigned (preferably in batches). Examination Time: 4 hours.
Pattern of setting questions: Compulsory questions are to be set for 40 marks. 10 marks are to be allocated for
Evaluation of Practical Notebook (5 marks) and Viva-voce (5 marks). Right hand side parentheses indicate lecture
hours.

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS – NUMERICAL DATA PROCESSING (50)
1.0 COMPUTATION, SORTING AND FORMATTING OF SPREADSHEETS (15)
1.1 Derivation of rank, mean, median and mode.
1.2 Computation of standard deviation, sample variation and moving average.
1.3 Derivation of correlation, covariance and regression.
1.4 Use of function. F-test, t-test and z-test.
2.0 PREPARATION OF ANNOTATED DIAGRAMS (10)
2.1 Simple and compound bar and line graphs.
2.2 Pie and doughnut diagrams.
2.3 Scatter diagrams.
2.4 Histograms.
3.0 PREPARATION OF ANNOTATED GRAPHIC FILES (15)
3.1 Cleaning and editing of scanned files.
3.2 Creation of layers.
3.3 Digitisation of scanned files.
3.4 Annotation of scanned and digitised files.
4.0 PRACTICAL NOTEBOOK AND VIVA-VOCE (10)

MODULE-20
Full Marks: 50. At least even number of periods to be assigned (preferably in batches). Examination Time: 4 hours.
Pattern of setting questions: Compulsory questions are to be set for 40 marks. 10 marks are to be allocated for
Evaluation of Practical Notebook (5 marks) and Viva-voce (5 marks). Right hand side parentheses indicate lecture
hours.

Methodology Environmental Research & Thematic Mapping of Environments
(50)
Group-A - Methodology of Environmental Research (20)
1. Research Paradigms
2. Identification of Research Problems and specification of the Objectives of the Study.
3. Development of theoretical background – literature survey.
4. Methods of data collection: Questionnaire and schedule.
5. Report writing.
6. Methods of writing Notes, References, Bibliography.
7. Examples on some problems of environmental research using tools of Remote Sensing
and GIS

Group-B: Thematic Mapping of Environments
Physical: (14)
Mapping on themes covering physical attributes: Relief, Morphometry (Relative Relief,
Dissection Index, Ruggedness Index, Drainage Density, and Hypsometry), Climatology,
Flora and Fauna.
Cultural: (6)
Mapping on themes covering cultural attributes: settlement, road network,
embankments, tanks etc.

PRACTICAL NOTEBOOK AND VIVA-VOCE (10)

REFERENCES (under preparation,
yet to be finalized)

PART I
PAPER-I : GEOTECTONICS, GEOMORPHOLOGY, HYDROLOGY AND OCEANOGRAPHY
Bloom, Arther L., 2003. Geomorphology – A systematic analysis of Late Cenozoic Landforms, 3rd Edn. 482p.
Chorley, R., Schumm, S. and Sugden, D.E. 1994. Geomorphology, Methuen, London: 605p. [Sections 1, 2, 3]
Cook and Doorncamp. 1988. Geomorphology in Environment Management, London: [Topic 1.4]
Faniran, A. and Jeje, L.K. 1983. Humid Tropical Geomorphology, Longman, London: 340p. [Topic 2.3, 2.4]
Garrison, T. 1993. Oceanography: An Invitation to Marine Science, Wadsworth Pub. Co., Belmont: 540 p. [Topics 4.1, 4.2, 4.3]
Johnson, H.D. and Baldwin, C.T. 1996. ‘Shallow clastic seas.’ In Reading H.G. (editor): Sedimentary Environments: Processes,
Facies and Stratigraphy, 3rd edition, Blackwell Science Ltd. Oxford: pp 232–280. [Topic 2.3]
Kale, V.S. and Gupta, A. 2001. Introduction to Geomorphology, Orient Longman Ltd., Hyderabad: 274p. [Topics ]
Keary, P. and Vine, M. 1997. Global Tectonics, 2nd edition, Blackwell Scientific Publications, Oxford: 302p.
Knighton, D.1998 : Fluvial Forms and Processes: A New Perspective, Arnold, London: 385p. [Topic 2.1; Section 4]
Lal, D. S., 2003. Oceanography, 3rd Edn. 288p.
Mitchell, C.W 1991. Terrain Evaluation, 2nd edition, Longman Scientific & Technical, Harlow: 441p. [Topics 1.3, 3.3]
Morisawa, M. (editor) 1994. Geomorphology and Natural Hazards, Elsevier, Amsterdam: 355p. [Topic 1.4]
Morisawa, M. 1985. Rivers, Longman, London: 222p. [Topic 2.1, Section 4]
Ollier, C.D. 1981: Tectonic Geomorphology, Longman Scientific & Technical, London: [Topic: 3.2]
Murthy, K.S. 1998. Watershed Management in India, 3rd edition, Wiely Eastern Ltd. / New Age International Ltd., New Delhi:
198p. [Topic 3.4]
Newson, M. 1992. Land Water and Development, River Basin Systems and their Sustainable Management, Routledge, London:
350p. [Topic 3.4]
Pethick, J. 1984. An Introduction to Coastal Geomorphology, Edward Arnold, London: 259 p. [Topics 2.3, 4.4]
Petts, G. and Foster, I. 1985. Rivers and Landscapes, Edward Arnold, London, 274p. [Section 4]
Petts, G.E. and Amoros, C. (editors) 1996. Fluvial Hydrosystems, Chapman and Hall, London: 322p. [Topics 4.3, 4.4]
Rice, R.J. 1988. Fundamentals of Geomorphology, 2nd edition, Longman Scientific and Technical, London: 420p. [Sections 1~4]
Selby, M.J. 1985. An Introduction to Geomorphology, Clarendon, Oxford: 607p. [Sections 1,2, 3]
Sharma, H.S. 1987. Tropical Geomorphology : A Morphogenetic Study of Rajashan, South Asia Books, Jaipur: 124p. [Topic 5.4]
Starkel, L. and Basu, S. 2000 Rains, Landslides and Floods in the Darjeeling Himalaya, Indian National Science academy, New
Delhi: 168p. [Topic 5.2].
Summerfield, M.A. (Editor) 1991. Global Geomorphology : An Introduction to the Study of Landforms, John Wiley and Sons Ltd.,
New York: 560p. [Sections 1~4]
Thornbury, W.D. 1969. Principles of Geomorphology, Wiley Eastern Limited, New Delhi: 594 p. [Topics 2.4, 3.2, 4.3]
Tinkler, 1985. A Short History of Geomorphology, Croom Helm Ltd., Beckenham: 315p. [Topic 1.1, 1.2]
Valdiya, K.S. 1998. Dynamic Himalaya, University Press (India) Ltd., Hyderabad: 178p. [Topic 5.2].
Wilson, J.P. and Gallant, J.C. (editors) 2000. Terrain Analysis : Principles and Applications, John Wiley and Sons Ltd. New York:
479p. [Topic 3.3]
Wirthmann, A. 2000. Geomorphology of the Tropics, Translated by Busche, D. Springer-Verlag, Berlin: 225p. [Topic 2.2]

PAPER-II : CLIMATOLOGY & ENVIRONMENT STUDY
Climatology
Anthes, R. 1997: Meteorology, 7th edition, Prentice-Hall Inc., Upper Saddle River: 214p.
Barry, R.G. and Chorley, R.T. 1992: Atmosphere, Weather and Climate, 6th edition, Routledge, London: 392p.
Brigg, G.R. 1996 : The Ocean and Climate, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge: 266p.
Coch, N.K. 1995 : Geohazards: Natural and Human, Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs: 481 p.
Critchfield, H.J. 1983: General Climatology, 4th edition, Prentice Hall India Ltd., New Delhi: 453p.
Das, P.K. 1995 : Monsoons, 2nd edition, National Book Trust, New Delhi: 347p.
Elsom, D.M. 1992 : Atmospheric Pollution: A Global Problem, 2nd edition, Blackwell Pub. Co., London: 422p.
Lal, D.S. 1993 : Climatology, 3rd edition, Chaitanya Pub. House, New Delhi: 412p.
Linacre, E. and Geerts, B. 1997 : Climates and Weather Explained, Routledge, London: 464p.
Lutgens, F.K.. and Tarbuck, E.J. 1998 : The Atmosphere: An Introduction to Meteorology, 7th edition, Prentice-Hall Inc., Upper
Saddle River: 434p.

Moran, J.M. and Morgan, M.D. 1997 : Meteorology: The Atmosphere and the Science of Weather, 5th edition, Prentice-Hall Inc.,
Upper Saddle River: 530p.
Pant, G.B. and Kumar, R.K. 1997: Climates of South Asia, John Wiley and Sons Ltd., Chichester: 320p.
Smith, K. 1996 : Environmental Hazards: Assessing Risk and Reducing Disaster, 2nd edition, Routledge, London; 389p.
Taylor, J.A. (editor) 1974 : Climatic Resources and Economic Activity, David & Charles, London: 264p.

Environment Study
Adams, W.M. 1995 : Green Development: Environmental Sustainability in the Third World, Rout1edge, London: pp 1-8,87-139.
Alexander, D. 1993: Natural Disasters, Research Press, New Delhi: 619p.
Allaby, M. 1996 : Basics of Environmental Science, Routledge, London: 297p.
Baarrsches, W.H. 1996 : Eco-facts and Eco-fiction: Understanding the Environmental Debate, Routledge, London: 264p.
Chapman, D. 1.994: Natural Hazards, Oxford University Press, Melbourne: 174p.
Chapman J.L. and Reiss, M.J. 1993: Ecology: Principles and Applications, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge: 294p.
Dasgupta, P. and Mller, K.G. 1997 : The Environment and Emerging Development Issues, Volumes I and 2, Clarendon Press,
Oxford: 593p.
Elsom, D.M. 1992 : Atmospheric Pollution: A Global Problem, 2nd edition, Blackwell Pub. Co., London: 422p.
Falconer, R.A. and Goodwin, P. (editor) 1994 : Wetland Management, Thomas Telford, London: 289p.
Farmer, A. 1997 : Managing Environmental Pollution, Routledge, London: 246p.
Gilpin, A. 1996 : Dictionary of Environment and Sustainable Development, John Wiley and Sons Ltd., Chichester: 147p.
Marsh, W.M. and Grossa, J.M. 1996: Environmental Geography: Science, Landuse and Earth Systems, John Wiley and Sons Inc.,
New York: 416p.
Masters, G .M. 1991 : Introduction to Environmental Engineering and Sciences, Prentice Hall India Ltd. New Delhi: 460p.
Middleton N. 1995 : The Global Casino: An .Introduction to Environmental Issues, John Wiley and Sons Inc., New York: 332p.
Park, C. 1998: The Environment: Principles and Applications, Routledge, London:
Pickering, K. and Owen, L.A. 1997 : An Introduction to Global Environmental Issues, 2nd edition, Routledge, London:
Prabhakar, V.R. 1998: Social and Community Forestry, indian Pub. Distrb., New Delhi: 224p.
Roberts, N. (editor) 1994: The Changing Global Environment, 3rd edition, Blackwell Pub. Co., London: 531 p.
Singh, R.B. and Misra, S. 1996 : Environmental Laws in .India: .Issues and Responses, Rawat Pub., New Delhi: 303p.
Valancy, F. and Bronstein, D.A. 1995 : Environmental and Social .Impact Assessment, John Wiley and Sons inc., New York: 325p.
Vogler, J. 1995 : The Global Commons : A Regime Analysis, John Wiley and Sons Ltd., Chichester: 233p. 55
Wall, D. 1994 : Green History: A Reader in Environmental literature, Philosophy and Politics, Routledge, London: 273p.
Whyte, ill. 1995 : Climate Change and Human Society, Arnold, London: 217p.
Woodward, F.I. 1992 : Global Climatic Change: The Ecological Consequences, Academic Press, London: 337p.
Hardoy, J .E Mittin, D. & Satterthwaite, D. 1992 : Environment Problems in the World Cities, Earthscan Pub. Ltd. London:

PAPER-III : SETTLEMENT STUDY & POPULATION STUDY
Ahmad, A. 1993 : Social Structure and Regional Development, Rawat Pub. Co., New Delhi: pp 1-16,17-77, 129-157.
Blunden, J., Haggett, P., Harnnett, C. and Sarre, P. ( 1985): The Fundamentals of Human Geography, Harper and Row, New York:
pp 7-17,27-33.
Carter, J. And Jones, T. 1989 : Social Geography: An Introduction to Contemporary Issues, Edward Arnold, London: 259p.
De Blij H.J. 1995 : The Earth: An Introduction to its Physical and Human Geography, John Wiley and Sons Inc., New York: 468p.
De Blij H.J. 1996: Human Geography: Culture, Society and Space, John Wiley and Sons Inc., New York: 531 p.
Dickinson, R.E. 1968 : City and Region: A Geographical Interpretation, Routledge and Kegam Paul Ltd. London.
Ghosh, S. 1998: Introduction to Settlement Geography, Orient Longman Ltd., Calcutta: 158p.
Hardoy, J .E., Mittin, D. & Satterthwaite, D. 1992 : Environmental Problems in the World Cities, Earthscan Pub. Ltd. London.
Hudson, F.S. 1970: Geography of Settlements, Macdonald and Evans Ltd., Plymouth: 3-12,61-70, 79-101, 141-145,217-230.
Hussain, M. 1994: Human Geography, Rawat Pub. Co., New Delhi: 485p.
Mandal, R.B. 1988 : Systems of Rural Settlements in Developing Counties, Concept Pub. Co., New Delhi.
Misra. H.N. (ed) 1987 : Contributions to Indian Geography, Volume 9: Rural Geography, Heritage Pub., New Delhi.
Racine, J. (ed) : Calcutta 1981, Concept Pub. Co., New Delhi.
Ramachandran R. 1989 : Urbanisation arid Urban Systems in India, Oxford University Press, New Delhi.
Singh, R.L. et. al. (ed) 1976: Geographic Dimensions of Rural Settlements, National Geographical Society of India, Varanasi.
Singh, R. Y. ( 1994) : Geography of Settlements, Rawat Pub. Co., New Delhi: 335p.
Tewari, V. Weinston, J. and Prakash Rao, V.L.S. 1986 : Indian Cities: Ecological Perspectives, Concept Pub. Co., New Delhi. pp
1-2, 85, 221-273.

PAPER IV: LANDUSE PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT, RESOURCE USE &
MANAGEMENT
Landuse Planning and Management
Chitambar, J.B. 1993: Introductory Rural Sociology, Wiley Eastern, New Delhi: pp 129-285.
Goomen, M.A. and Datta, A. 1995 : Panchayats and their Finance, Rawat Pub. Co., New Delhi: 76p.
Institute of Social Sciences 1994: Decentralised Planning and Panchayati Raj, Rawat Pub. Co., New Delhi: 64p.
Mandal, R..B. 1'988 : Systems of Rural Settlements in Developing Counties, Concept Pub. Co., New Delhi: 103
Matthews G. (editor) 1995 : Status of Panchayati Raj: 1994, Institute of Social Sciences / Rawat Pub. Co.,
New Delhi: 232p.
Matthews a. 1994: Panchayati Raj: From Legislation to Movements, Rawat Pub. Co., New Delhi: 130p.
Misra, H.M. (ed) 1987 : Contributions to Indian Geography, Volume 9: Rural Geography, Heritage Pub., New Delhi.
De Blij, H.J. and Muller, P.O. 1997 : Geography: Realms Regions and Concepts, 8th edition, John Wiley and Sons Ltd., New
York: 569p.
Dickinson, J., Gould, B., Clarke, C., Mather, S., Prothero, M., Siddle, D., Smith, C. and Thomas-Hope, E. 1996 : A Geography of
the Third World, 2nd edition, Routledge, London: 334p.
Singh, R.L. (editor) 1971 : India: A Regional Geography, National Geographical Society of India / UBS Pub. Distributors Ltd.,
New Delhi: 992p.
Spate, O.H.K. and Learmonth, A. T.A. 1967 : India and Pakistan, 3rd edition, Munshiram Monoharlal Pub. Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi:
877p.

Resource Use & Management
Brereton, E. 1992 : Resource Use and Management, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge: 118p.
Elliotte, j. A. 1994 : An Introduction to Sustainable Development: The Developing World, Routledge, London: 121 p.
Mitchell, B. 1997 : Resources and Environment Management, Addison Wesley Lon~an Ltd., Harlow: 298p.
Pickering, K. and Owen, L.A. 1997 : An Introduction to Global Environmental Issues, 2nd edition, Routledge, London: 345p.
Johnston, R.J., Taylor, P.J. and Watts, M.J. (editors) : 1995: Geographies of Global Change: Remapping the World in the Late
Twentieth Century, Blackwell, Oxford: 440p.
United Nations Populations Fund 1997 : India Towards Population and Development Goals, Oxford University Press, New Delhi:
194p.
Unwin, T. (editor) 1994: Atlas of World Development, John Wiley and Sons Ltd., Chichester: 364p.
World Bank 1996: From Plan to Market: World Development Report 1996, Oxford University Press, Oxford: 241 p.
World Resources Institute 1998: World Resources 1998-99: A Guide to the Global Environment, Oxford University Press, Oxford:
369p

PAPER-V : (PRACTICAL PAPER)
GROUND SURVEY AND AERIAL PHOTO-INTERPRETATION; QUANTITATIVE METHODS
IN GEOGRAPHY
Allison, L.J., Schnapf, A.(1983) Meteorological satellites: In Colwell, R.N.(ed.) Manual of Remote Sensing (2nd edn). American
Society of Photogrammetry, Falls Church, Virginia, pp.651-79
A.S.P. (1981) Manual of Photogrammetry (4th edn). American Society of Photogrammetry, Falls Church, Virginia.
Alvi, Z. 1995 : Statistical Geography: Methods and Applications, Rawat Pub. New Delhi: 194p.
Beaumont, J .R. and Williams, S.W. 1983 : Project Work in the Geography Curriculum, Croom Helm, London: 332p.
Campbell, J .B. 1996 : Introduction to Remote Sensing, 2nd edition, Taylor & Francis, London: 622p.
Chaisman, N. 1992: Exploring Geographical Information Systems, John Wiley and Sons Inc., New York: 198p.
Colwell, R.N.(ed.) Manual of Remote Sensing (2nd edn). American Society of Photogrammetry, Falls Church, Virginia, pp.231-91
Curran, P.J. (1988) Principles of Remote Sensing, ELBS Edn. Longman Group UK Ltd.
Elfic, M.H., Fryer, J.G. Brinkner, R.C. and Wolf, P.R. 1994: Elementary Surveying, 8th edition, Harper Collins Publishers,
London: 510 p.
Guha, P.K. (2003) Remote Sensing for the Beginner, Affiliated East-West Press Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi
Houghton, J.T., Cook, A.H. and Charnock, H.(1983) The study of Land surface from satellites. The Royal Society of London (first
published in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, Series A, 309, pp. 241-464)
Hussain, S.K. and Nagaraj, M.S. 1992 :Text Book of Surveying, S. Chand & Co. Ltd., New Delhi:

Kanetkar, T.P. and Kulkatni, S. V. 1.988 : Surveying and Levelling, Part I, Pune Vidyarthi Griha Prakashan, Pune: 608p.
Kellaway, G.P. 1979 : Map Projections, 1st Indian edition, B.I. Publication, Delhi.
Kochher, C.L. 1993 : A Text Book of Surveying, S.K. Katariya & Sons, Delhi:
Lillesand, T.M. and Kiefer, R. W. 2003 : Remote Sensing and Image Interpretation, 5th edition, John Wiley and Sons, New York:
Marcolongo, B. And Mantorani, F. 1997 : Photogeology: Remote Sensing Application in Earth Science, Oxford and IBH Pub. Pvt.
Ltd., New Delhi: 195p.
Monkhouse F.J. and Wilkinson, H.R. 1971. : Maps and Diagrams: Their Compilation and Construction, B.I. Publications Private
Limited, New Delhi: 527p.
Pal, S.K. 1999 : Statistics for Geoscientists, Concept publishing Company, New Delhi: 423p.
Parsons, T. and Knight, P.1995 : How To Do .Your Dissertation in Geography and Allied Disciplines. Chapman and Hall, London.
151 p.
Robinson, A.H., Sale, R.D., Morrison, J. 1984 : Elements of Cartography, Wiley, New York:
Roy, P. 1988 : An Analytical Study of Map Projections, Volume 1, Kolkata:
Sarkar, A. 1997 : Practical Geography: A Systematic Approach, Orient Longman Ltd., Hyderabad:
Sheffield, C. (1983) Man on Earth, Sidgwick and Jackson, London
Shepherd, F.A. 1983 : Engineering Surveying, Edward Arnold, London:
Slater, P.N. (1983) Photographic systems for remote sensing
Silk, J. 1979 : Statistical techniques in Geography, George Allen and Unwin, London: 276p:
Singh, N. Surveying, Tata McGraw-Hill Publishing Company Ltd., New Delhi:
Singh, R.L. and Singh, R.P.B. 1.991 : Elements of Practical Geography, Kalyani Pub. New Delhi: 421p.
Steers, J.A. 1965 : An Introduction to Map Projections, 14th ion, University of London Press, London:
Venkatramaiah, C. 1996 : A Textbook of Surveying, Universities Press / Orient Longman Ltd., Hyderabad: 76p.
Walford, P.,1995: Geographical Data Analysis, John Wiley and Sons Inc., New York: 446p.

PART II
PAPER-VI : GEOGRAPHICAL THOUGHTS; REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT & MULTILEVEL PLANNING
GEOGRAPHICAL THOUGHTS
Adhikari, S. 1992 : Geographical Thought, Chaitanya Pub. House, Allahabad: 272p.
Binege, W. 1962 : Theoretical Geography, Glenerp, London: 897p.
Chorley, R.J. and Hagget, P. (editors) 1965 : Frontiers in Geographical Teaching, OUP, Oxford: 231p.
Dikshit, R.D. (editor) 1994 : The Art and Science of Geography: Selected Readings, Prentice Hall India Ltd., New Delhi: 195p.
Dunbar, G.S. (editor) 1991: Modern Geography: An Encyclopaedic Survey, St. James Press, Chicago: 219p.
Gregory D. and Walford, R. (editors) 1988 : Horizons in Human Geography, Macmillan, London: 390p.
Hussain, M. 1995: Evolution of Geographical thought, 3rd edition, Rawat Pub. Co., New Delhi: 432p.
Messy, D. and Allen, J. (editors) 1984 : Geography Matters: A Reader, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge: 204p.
Stoddart, D.R. 1986 : On Geography and its History, Basil Blackwell, Oxford: 236p.

REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT & MULTILEVEL PLANNING
Chitambar, J.B. 1993: Introductory Rural Sociology, Wiley Eastern, New Delhi: pp 129-285.
Goomen, M.A. and Datta, A. 1995 : Panchayats and their Finance, Rawat Pub. Co., New Delhi: 76p.
Institute of Social Sciences 1994: Decentralised Planning and Panchayati Raj, Rawat Pub. Co., New Delhi: 64p.
Mandal, R..B. 1'988 : Systems of Rural Settlements in Developing Counties, Concept Pub. Co., New Delhi: 103
Matthews G. (editor) 1995 : Status of Panchayati Raj: 1994, Institute of Social Sciences / Rawat Pub. Co.,
New Delhi: 232p.
Matthews a. 1994: Panchayati Raj: From Legislation to Movements, Rawat Pub. Co., New Delhi: 130p.
Misra, H.M. (ed) 1987 : Contributions to Indian Geography, Volume 9: Rural Geography, Heritage Pub., New Delhi.
De Blij, H.J. and Muller, P.O. 1997 : Geography: Realms Regions and Concepts, 8th edition, John Wiley and Sons Ltd., New
York: 569p.
Dickinson, J., Gould, B., Clarke, C., Mather, S., Prothero, M., Siddle, D., Smith, C. and Thomas-Hope, E. 1996 : A Geography of
the Third World, 2nd edition, Routledge, London: 334p.
Singh, R.L. (editor) 1971 : India: A Regional Geography, National Geographical Society of India / UBS Pub. Distributors Ltd.,
New Delhi: 992p.
Spate, O.H.K. and Learmonth, A. T.A. 1967 : India and Pakistan, 3rd edition, Munshiram Monoharlal Pub. Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi:

877p.
PAPER-VII : GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES - POLLUTION AND HAZARDS; POLITICAL AND
ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY
Global Environmental Issues - pollution and Hazards
Adams, W.M. 1995 : Green Development: Environmental Sustainability in the Third World, Rout1edge, London: pp 1-8,87-139.
Alexander, D. 1993: Natural Disasters, Research Press, New Delhi: 619p.
Allaby, M. 1996 : Basics of Environmental Science, Routledge, London: 297p.
Baarrsches, W.H. 1996 : Eco-facts and Eco-fiction: Understanding the Environmental Debate, Routledge, London: 264p.
Blaikie, P., Cannon, To Davis, I. and Wisener, 1994: At Risk: Natural Hazards, People's Vulnerability and Disasters, Routledge,
London: 320p.
Bryant, E.A. 1991 : Natural Hazards, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge: 294p.
Canter, L. W. 1996 : Environmental Impact Assessment, 2nd edition, McGraw Hill, New York: 660p.
Chapman, D. 1.994: Natural Hazards, Oxford University Press, Melbourne: 174p.
Chapman J.L. and Reiss, M.J. 1993: Ecology: Principles and Applications, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge: 294p.
Chhatwal, G.R., Mensa, M.C., Satke, M., Katyal, T., Katyal, Mo, and Nagahiro, T. 1989 : Environmental Noise Pollution and its
Control, Anmol Pub. Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi: 301p.
CoIls, J. 1997: Air Pollution: An Introduction, E & FN Spon / Chapman and Hall, London: 314p.
Dasgupta, P. and Mller, K.G. 1997 : The Environment and Emerging Development Issues, Volumes I and 2, Clarendon Press,
Oxford: 593p.
Elsom, D.M. 1992 : Atmospheric Pollution: A Global Problem, 2nd edition, Blackwell Pub. Co., London: 422p.
Falconer, R.A. and Goodwin, P. (editor) 1994 : Wet and Management, Thomas Telford, London: 289p.
Farmer, A. 1997 : Managing Environmental Pollution, Routledge, London: 246p.
Gilpin, A. 1996 : Dictionary of Environment and Sustainable Development, John Wiley and Sons Ltd., Chichester: 147p.
Gilpin, A. 1997 : Environmental Impact Assessment: Culling Edge for the Twenty-first Century, Cambridge University Press,
Cambridge: 181p.
Goel, P.K. 1997: Water Pollution: Causes, Effects and Controls, New Age International (P) Ltd. Pub. New Delhi: 169p.
Goudie, A. 1986: The Human Impact on the Natural Environment, 2nd edition, Blackwell Pub. Co., London: 337p.
Marsh, W.M. and Grossa, J.M. 1996: Environmental Geography: Science, Landuse and Earth Systems, John Wiley and Sons Inc.,
New York: 416p.
Masters, G .M. 1991 : Introduction to Environmental Engineering and Sciences, Prentice Hall India Ltd. New Delhi: 460p.
Middleton N. 1995 : The Global Casino: An .Introduction to Environmental Issues, John Wiley and Sons Inc., New York: 332p.
Park, C. 1998: The Environment: Principles and Applications, Routledge, London:
Pickering, K. and Owen, L.A. 1997 : An Introduction to Global Environmental Issues, 2nd edition, Routledge, London:
Prabhakar, V.R. 1998: Social and Community Forestry, indian Pub. Distrb., New Delhi: 224p.
Roberts, N. (editor) 1994: The Changing Global Environment, 3rd edition, Blackwell Pub. Co., London: 531 p.
Singh, R.B. and Misra, S. 1996 : Environmental Laws in .India: .Issues and Responses, Rawat Pub., New Delhi: 303p.
Valancy, F. and Bronstein, D.A. 1995 : Environmental and Social .Impact Assessment, John Wiley and Sons inc., New York: 325p.
Vogler, J. 1995 : The Global Commons : A Regime Analysis, John Wiley and Sons Ltd., Chichester: 233p. 55
Wall, D. 1994 : Green History: A Reader in Environmental literature, Philosophy and Politics, Routledge, London: 273p.
Wathern, P. (editor) 1988 : Environmental Impact Assessment: Theory and Practice, Routledge, London: 332p.
Whyte, ill. 1995 : Climate Change and Human Society, Arnold, London: 217p.
Woodward, F.I. 1992 : Global Climatic Change: The Ecological Consequences, Academic Press, London: 337p.
Hardoy, J .E Mittin, D. & Satterthwaite, D. 1992 : Environment Problems in the World Cities, Earthscan Pub. Ltd. London:

Political and Economic Geography
Hartshorn and Alexander, 1988: Economic Geography, 3rd edition, Prentice- Hall India Ltd., New Delhi
Leong, G.C. and Morgan, G.C. 1982, Human and Economic Geography, 2nd edition, Oxford University Press, Oxford: 662p.
Mamoria, C.B. 1996 : Economic and Commercial Geography of India, Revised edition, Shivalal Aggarwala and Co., Agra: 566p.
Guha, J .L. and Chattoraj, P.R. 1998 : A New Approach to Economic Geography: A Study of Resources, 15th edition, World Press,
Calcutta: 849p.
Shanna, T. C. and Coutinho, O. 1998 : Economic and Commercial Geography of India, 3rd edition, Vikash Pub. House Pvt. Ltd.,
New Delhi, 392p.

PAPER-VIII, IX : MODULES – 15, 16, 17 (ELECTIVE SPECIAL PAPERS)
Option-1: Advanced Agricultural Geography and Advanced Pedology
Advanced Agricultural Geography
Briggs, D. 1985: Agriculture and Environment, Longman, London: pp 1- 40, 143-306.
Husain, M. 1996 : Systematic Agricultural Geography, Rawat Pub. New Delhi: 430p. ,
Joy, T.V. 1990: Agricultural Ecology, Longman, London: pp 1-243,244- 261.
McLaren, R.G. and Cameron, K.C. 1996 : Soil Science, Sustainable Production and Environmental Protection, 2nd edition, Oxford
University Press, Auckland: 304p.
Singh, J. and Dhillon, S.S. 198,4: Agricultural Geography, 2nd edition, Tata McGraw-Hill, New Delhi, 443p.
Mitchell, C. W. 199 I: Terrain Evaluation: An Introductory Handbook to the History Principles and Methods of Practical Terrain
Analysis, 2nd edition, Longman Science & Technical, London: 441 p.
Wigley, G. 198 I: Tropical Agriculture: The Development of Production, 4th edition, Arnold, London: 96p.

Advanced Pedology
A.G. Pimente, J. D. (editor) 1993 : World Soil Erosion and Conservation, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge: 349p.
Biswas, T.D. and Mukherjee, S.K. 1987 : Textbook of Soil Science, Tata-McGraw-Hill, 314p.
Brady, N..C. and Weil, R.R. 1996 : The Nature and Properties of Soil, 11th edition, Longman, London: 740p.
Coleman, D.C. and Crossby, J. 1996 : Fundamentals of Soil Ecology, Academic Press, San Diego: 203p.
Ellis, S. and MelIor, R. 1995 : Soils and Environment, Routledge, London: 364p.
Floth, H.D. 1990 : Fundamentals of Soil Science, 8th edition, John Wiley and Sons, New York: 360p.
Mitchell, C. W. 1991 : Terrain Evaluation: An Introductory Handbook to the History, Principles and Methods of Practical Terrain
Analysis, 2nd edition, Longman Science & Technical, London: 441 p.
Morgan, R.P.C. 1995 : Soil Erosion and Conservation, 2nd edition, Longman, London: 198p.
Schwab, G.O., Fangmeir, D.D. and Elliot, W.J. 1996 : Soil and Water Management Systems, 4th edition, John Wiley and Sons Inc.,
New York: 371p. I
Singer, M.J. and MuMs, D.N. 1996 : Soils: An Introduction, Prentice Hall, London: 480p.
Wild, A. 1993 : Soils and the Environment: An Introduction, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge: 287p.

Option-2: Coastal Management
Bird, E.C.F. 2000. An Introduction to Coastal Geomorphology, John Wiley and Sons Ltd. New York: 340 p. [Topics 2.3, 4.4]
Carter, R.W.G. 1988. Coastal Environments: An Introduction to the Physical, Ecological and Cultural Systems of Coastlines,
Academic Press, London: 617p. [Topic 2.3]
Chow, V.T, Maidment, D.R. and Mays, L.W. 1988. Applied Hydrology, McGraw-Hill, New York: 572 p. [Topic 3.2]
Garrison, T. 1993. Oceanography: An Invitation to Marine Science, Wadsworth Pub. Co., Belmont: 540 p. [Topics 4.1, 4.2, 4.3]
Johnson, H.D. and Baldwin, C.T. 1996. ‘Shallow clastic seas.’ In Reading H.G. (editor): Sedimentary Environments: Processes,
Facies and Stratigraphy, 3rd edition, Blackwell Science Ltd. Oxford: pp 232–280. [Topic 2.3]
Knighton, D.1998 : Fluvial Forms and Processes: A New Perspective, Arnold, London: 385p. [Topics 2.1, 2.2]
Morisawa, M. 1985. Rivers, Longman, London: 222p. [Topics 2.1, 2.2, 3.1]
Murthy, K.S. 1998. Watershed Management in India, 3rd edition, Wiely Eastern Ltd. / New Age International Ltd., New Delhi:
198p. [Topic 3.4]
Newson, M. 1992. Land Water and Development, River Basin Systems and their Sustainable Management, Routledge, London:
350p. [Topic 3.4]
Pethick, J. 1984. An Introduction to Coastal Geomorphology, Edward Arnold, London: 259 p. [Topics 2.3, 4.4]
Petts, G.E. and Amoros, C. (editors) 1996. Fluvial Hydrosystems, Chapman and Hall, London: 322p. [Topics 1.2, 2.2]
Pirazzoli, P.A. 1996. Sea Level Changes: The Last 20,000 Years, Routledge, London: 224p. [Topic: 4.4]
Price, M. 1996. Introducing Groundwater, 2nd edition, Chapman & Hall, London: 224p. [Topic 3.2]
Seibold, E. and Berger, W.H. 1996. The Sea Floor: An Introduction to Marine Geology, 3rd edition, Springer-Verlag, Berlin: 354p.
[Topic 4.1]
Wilby, R. 1996. Contemporary Hydrology, Wiley, Chichester: 250p. [Topic 3.2]

Option-3: Regional and Urban Planning
Carter, H. 1981 : Urban Geography, 3rd edition Arnold-Heinemann, New Delhi: 434p.
De Blij, H.J. and Muller, P.O. 1997 : Geography: Realms Regions and Concepts, 8th edition, John Wiley and Sons Ltd., New
York: 569p.
Dickinson, J., Gould, B., Clarke, C., Mather, S., Prothero, M., Siddle, D., Smith, C. and Thomas-Hope, E. 1996 : A Geography of

the Third World, 2nd edition, Routledge, London: 334p.
Dickinson, R.E. 1968 : City and Region: A Geographical Interpretation, Routledge and Kegam Paul Ltd. London.
Ghosh, S. 1998: Introduction to Settlement Geography, Orient Longman Ltd., Calcutta: 158p.
Hardoy, J .E., Mittin, D. & Satterthwaite, D. 1992 : Environmental Problems in the World Cities, Earthscan Pub. Ltd. London.
Hudson, F.S. 1970: Geography of Settlements, Macdonald and Evans Ltd., Plymouth: 3-12,61-70, 79-101, 141-145,217-230.
Knox, P. 1982: Urban Social Geography, Longman Scientific and Technical, Harlow.
Mandal, R.B. 1988 : Systems of Rural Settlements in Developing Counties, Concept Pub. Co., New Delhi.
Misra. H.N. (ed) 1987 : Contributions to Indian Geography, Volume 9: Rural Geography, Heritage Pub., New Delhi.
Racine, J. (ed) : Calcutta 1981, Concept Pub. Co., New Delhi.
Ramachandran R. 1989 : Urbanisation arid Urban Systems in India, Oxford University Press, New Delhi.
Singh, R.L. et. al. (ed) 1976: Geographic Dimensions of Rural Settlements, National Geographical Society of India, Varanasi.
Singh, R.L. (editor) 1971 : India: A Regional Geography, National Geographical Society of India / UBS Pub. Distributors Ltd.,
New Delhi: 992p.
Singh, R. Y. ( 1994) : Geography of Settlements, Rawat Pub. Co., New Delhi: 335p.
Spate, O.H.K. and Learmonth, A. T.A. 1967 : India and Pakistan, 3rd edition, Munshiram Monoharlal Pub. Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi:
877p.
Tewari, V. Weinston, J. and Prakash Rao, V.L.S. 1986 : Indian Cities: Ecological Perspectives, Concept Pub. Co., New Delhi. pp
1-2, 85, 221-273.

Option-4: Remote Sensing & GIS
American society of photogrammetry (ASP), Manual of remote sensing, second edition, ASP, Falls church,VA,1983
American society of photogrammetry (ASP), Multilingual dictionary of remote sensing and photogrammetry, ASP, Falls
church,VA,1983
American society for photogrammetry and remote sensing, glossary of mapping science, ASPRS,Bethesda, MD,1994
American society of photogrammetry and remote sensing, remote sensing for the earth science, manual of remote sensing,3rd
ed.,vol.3,woe;u,New York,1999
American society for photogrammetry and remote sensing, remote sensing core curriculum,
Allison, L.J., Schnapf, A.(1983) Meteorological satellites: In Colwell, R.N.(ed.) Manual of Remote Sensing (2nd edn). American
Society of Photogrammetry, Falls Church, Virginia, pp.651-79
A.S.P. (1981) Manual of Photogrammetry (4th edn). American Society of Photogrammetry, Falls Church, Virginia.
Avery,T.E.,and G.L.Berlin, Fundamental of remote sensing and airphoto interpretation,5th ed, Macmillan, New York,1992
Barrett,E.C., and L.F.Curtis, Introduction to environmental remote sensing, 3rd ed, Chapman and Hall, New York,1992
Billingsley, F.C. (1983) Data processing and reprocessing: In Colwell, R.N.(ed.) Manual of Remote Sensing (2nd edn). American
Society of Photogrammetry, Falls Church, Virginia, pp. 719-92.
Bukata,R.P., et al., Optical properties and remote sensing of Inland and coastal waters, CRC press, New York,1995
Burrough, P.A.,Principles of geographical information system for land resources assessment, 2nd ed., Oxford University press,
New York,1998
Campbell, J .B. 1996 : Introduction to Remote Sensing, 2nd edition, Taylor & Francis, London: 622p.
Canada Center for Remote Sensing, Remote Sensing Tutorial
Castleman, K.R. (1979) Digital Image Processing. Prentice Hall Inc, New Jersey.
Chaisman, N. 1992: Exploring Geographical Information Systems, John Wiley and Sons Inc., New York: 198p.
Chrisman, N.R. (1997) Exploring Geographic Information Systems. John Wiley andSons.
Cracknelll, A.P., and L.W.B.Hayes, Introduction to remote sensing, Taylor and Francis, Washington, DC,1991
DeMers, M.N.,Fundamentals of geographic information system, Wiley, New York, 1997
Curran, P.J. (1988) Principles of Remote Sensing, ELBS Edn. Longman Group UK Ltd.
Curran, P.J. (1980) Mulltispectral remote sensing of vegetation amount, Progress in Physical Geography, 4:315
David J Maguire, Michael F Goodchaild and David W Rahind., 1991, Geographical Information System, Ed.
Ian Masser & Michael Blakemore., 1991, Handling Geographical Information : Methodology and Potential Applications, Ed.
Foresman,T.W.(ed)History of GIS, Prentice-Hall, Upper saddle river, NJ,1998
Gerstl, S.A., 1990. Physics concept of optical radar reflectance signatures. A summary review, International journal of remote
sensing, vol 11,no 7
Guha, P.K. (2003) Remote Sensing for the Beginner, Affiliated East-West Press Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi
Gunter Sieber, - Satellite Geodesy
Houghton, J.T., Cook, A.H. and Charnock, H.(1983) The study of Land surface from satellites. The Royal Society of London (first
published in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, Series A, 309, pp. 241-464)
http://tsc.wes.army.mil/gps/whatisgps.htm
Humhold.W.E., 1991. An introduction to urban geographic information system, Oxford University press, New York
Huxhold, W.E. (1991) An Introduction to Urban Information Systems. New York, OUP.
Japan Association of Remote Sensing, Fundamentals of Remote Sensing
John, R. J., Introductory Digital Image Processing – A Remote Sensing Perspective, Prentice Hall Series
Jensen, J.R., 2000. Remote sensing of the environment: An earth resource perspective, Prentice Hall, Upper saddle river, NJ,
Joseph, George, (2003), Fundamental of Remote Sensing, University Press (India) Pvt. Ltd, Orient Longman Pte. Ltd., Hyderabad,
29
India
Laurini, R. and Thompson, D. (1992) Fundamentals of Spatial Information Systems. London, Academy Press.
Lillesand, T.M. and Kieffer, R.W., 2003. Remote Sensing and Image Interpretation, 5th Edition., Wiley, New York
Maguire, D.J., Goodchild, M.F. and Rhind, D.W. (eds.) (1991) Geographical Information Systems: Principles and Applications.
Avon, Longman Scientific and Technical.
Marcolongo, B. And Mantorani, F. 1997 : Photogeology: Remote Sensing Application in Earth Science, Oxford and IBH Pub. Pvt.
Ltd., New Delhi: 195p.
Martin, D. (1991) Geographical Information Systems and their Socioeconomic Applications. London, Routledge.
Peuquet, D.J. and Marble, D.F. (eds.) (1990) Introductory Readings in Geographic Information Systems. London, Taylor and
Francis.
Rajan, M.S. 1995 : Space Today, 2nd edition, National Book Trust, New Delhi, 344p.
Rao, U .R. 1996 : Space Technology for Sustainable Development, Tata McGraw-Hill, New Delhi: 564p.
Robert A. Schowengerdt, Techniques for Image Processing and Classification in Remote Sensing, (Academic Press, Inc).
Sabins, F.F., 1997 : Remote Sensing: Principles and Applications, 3rd edition, W.H. Freeman & Company, New York: 494p.
Sheffield, C. (1983) Man on Earth, Sidgwick and Jackson, London
Slater, P.N. (1983) Photographic systems for remote sensing
Singapore Science Center, Principles of Remote Sensing
Star, J. and Estes, J. (1990) Geographical Information Systems: An Introduction. Englewoods Cliffs, New Jersey, Prentice Hall.
Townshend, J.R.G. (1981) Image analysis and interpretation for land resources survey
Townshend, J.R.G. (ed.) Terrain Analysis and Remote Sensing, Allen & Unwin, London; Boston, pp. 59-108
Ulaby, F.T., Moore, R,K. and Fung, A.K. (1981) Microwave Remote Sensing, Active and Passive, Volume I, Fundamentals and
Radiometry. Addison-Wesley, Reading, Massachusetts; London.
Ulaby, F.T., Moore, R,K. and Fung, A.K. (1982) Microwave Remote Sensing Active and Passive, Volume II, Radar Remote
Sensing and Surface Scattering and Emission Theory. Addison-Wesley, Reading, Massachusetts; London.

Option-5: Rural Development
De Blij, H.J. and Muller, P.O. 1997 : Geography: Realms Regions and Concepts, 8th edition, John Wiley and Sons Ltd., New
York: 569p.
Dickinson, J., Gould, B., Clarke, C., Mather, S., Prothero, M., Siddle, D., Smith, C. and Thomas-Hope, E. 1996 : A Geography of
the Third World, 2nd edition, Routledge, London: 334p.
Chitambar, J.B. 1993: Introductory Rural Sociology, Wiley Eastern, New Delhi: pp 129-285.
Goomen, M.A. and Datta, A. 1995 : Panchayats and their Finance, Rawat Pub. Co., New Delhi: 76p.
Institute of Social Sciences 1994: Decentralised Planning and Panchayati Raj, Rawat Pub. Co., New Delhi: 64p.
Mandal, R..B. 1'988 : Systems of Rural Settlements in Developing Counties, Concept Pub. Co., New Delhi: 103
Matthews G. (editor) 1995 : Status of Panchayati Raj: 1994, Institute of Social Sciences / Rawat Pub. Co.,
New Delhi: 232p.
Matthews a. 1994: Panchayati Raj: From Legislation to Movements, Rawat Pub. Co., New Delhi: 130p.
Misra, H.M. (ed) 1987 : Contributions to Indian Geography, Volume 9: Rural Geography, Heritage Pub., New Delhi.
Singh, R.L. (editor) 1971 : India: A Regional Geography, National Geographical Society of India / UBS Pub. Distributors Ltd.,
New Delhi: 992p.
Spate, O.H.K. and Learmonth, A. T.A. 1967 : India and Pakistan, 3rd edition, Munshiram Monoharlal Pub. Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi:
877p.

PAPER- IX : MODULES – 18 REMOTE SENSING & GIS
American society of photogrammetry (ASP), Manual of remote sensing, second edition, ASP, Falls church,VA,1983
Burrough, P.A.,Principles of geographical information system for land resources assessment, 2nd ed., Oxford University press,
New York,1998
Campbell, J .B. 1996 : Introduction to Remote Sensing, 2nd edition, Taylor & Francis, London: 622p.
Canada Center for Remote Sensing, Remote Sensing Tutorial
Castleman, K.R. (1979) Digital Image Processing. Prentice Hall Inc, New Jersey.
Chaisman, N. 1992: Exploring Geographical Information Systems, John Wiley and Sons Inc., New York: 198p.
Chrisman, N.R. (1997) Exploring Geographic Information Systems. John Wiley andSons.
Cracknelll, A.P., and L.W.B.Hayes, Introduction to remote sensing, Taylor and Francis, Washington, DC,1991
DeMers, M.N.,Fundamentals of geographic information system, Wiley, New York, 1997
Curran, P.J. (1988) Principles of Remote Sensing, ELBS Edn. Longman Group UK Ltd.
Ian Masser & Michael Blakemore., 1991, Handling Geographical Information : Methodology and Potential Applications, Ed.
Gerstl, S.A., 1990. Physics concept of optical radar reflectance signatures. A summary review, International journal of remote
sensing, vol 11,no 7
Guha, P.K. (2003) Remote Sensing for the Beginner, Affiliated East-West Press Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi
Japan Association of Remote Sensing, Fundamentals of Remote Sensing
John, R. J., Introductory Digital Image Processing – A Remote Sensing Perspective, Prentice Hall Series
Jensen, J.R., 2000. Remote sensing of the environment: An earth resource perspective, Prentice Hall, Upper saddle river, NJ,
Joseph, George, (2003), Fundamental of Remote Sensing, University Press (India) Pvt. Ltd, Orient Longman Pte. Ltd., Hyderabad,
India
Lillesand, T.M. and Kieffer, R.W., 2003. Remote Sensing and Image Interpretation, 5th Edition., Wiley, New York
Martin, D. (1991) Geographical Information Systems and their Socioeconomic Applications. London, Routledge.
Rajan, M.S. 1995 : Space Today, 2nd edition, National Book Trust, New Delhi, 344p.
Rao, U .R. 1996 : Space Technology for Sustainable Development, Tata McGraw-Hill, New Delhi: 564p.
Robert A. Schowengerdt, Techniques for Image Processing and Classification in Remote Sensing, (Academic Press, Inc).
Sabins, F.F., 1997 : Remote Sensing: Principles and Applications, 3rd edition, W.H. Freeman & Company, New York: 494p.
Ulaby, F.T., Moore, R,K. and Fung, A.K. (1982) Microwave Remote Sensing Active and Passive, Volume II, Radar Remote
Sensing and Surface Scattering and Emission Theory. Addison-Wesley, Reading, Massachusetts; London.

PAPER-X : COMPUTER APPLICATIONS – NUMERICAL DATA PROCESSING &
METHODOLOGY ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH & THEMATIC MAPPING OF
ENVIRONMENTS

Alvi, Z. 1995 : Statistical Geography: Methods and Applications, Rawat Pub. New Delhi: 194p.
Pal, S.K. 1999 : Statistics for Geoscientists, Concept publishing Company, New Delhi: 423p.
Silk, J. 1979 : Statistical techniques in Geography, George Allen and Unwin, London: 276p:
Walford, P.,1995: Geographical Data Analysis, John Wiley and Sons Inc., New York: 446p.

Address
Vidyasagar University
Vidyasagar University Rd, Rangamati, Medinipur, West Bengal 721102 ‎
03222 276 554 ‎
April 9th, 2014 12:39 PM
Unregistered
Re: Vidyasagar university M.sc

Is there any one to provide me the Vidyasagar university M.sc geography syllabus????
May 17th, 2013 02:34 PM
Souvik pradhan
Re: Vidyasagar university M.sc

Plz give me previous question paper of m.sc exam entrance in chemistry
August 27th, 2012 08:54 PM
Unregistered
Re: Vidyasagar university M.sc

Hello, Sir can you give me the Question Paper of the MSc. Entrance examination of Vidyasagar University which had been held on August 2012. I'm the student of Botany Honours so I'll be thankfull if you kindly give me the Question Papers of Botany of the Msc. entrance examination.
June 24th, 2012 09:39 PM
anurdha bhuyan
Re: Vidyasagar university M.sc

qs type of Ms nutrition papper vidysagar university. Old examination qs pappr r availabul.
June 21st, 2012 09:07 AM
Bula Mondal
Re: Vidyasagar university M.sc

I have done Bsc nutrition(H) Iwant to admission Msc 2012 vidyasagar university. can u tell me when start admission and where I collect the application form and university prospectus.
June 21st, 2012 09:01 AM
Bula Mondal
Re: Vidyasagar university M.sc

I have done bsc in nutrition (H) Can you tell me when the university will start admission process in 2012?from where can I download application form for admission at Vidyasagar university and where submit it
June 7th, 2012 05:13 PM
Bula
Re: Vidyasagar university M.sc

Hello sir I have done my Bsc graduation and now looking for admission in m.sc course at Vidyasagar university. Can you tell me when the university will start admission process in 2012? Does Vidyasagar university conducts entrance examination for admission in its M.sc course? from where can I download application form for admission at Vidyasagar university
This thread has more than 10 replies. Click here to review the whole thread.


All times are GMT +6.5. The time now is 03:26 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9