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Old May 10th, 2014, 11:08 AM
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Default Re: ICFAI University, MBA, International Management II previous years question papers

As you want to get the ICFAI University, MBA, International Management II previous years question papers so here is the information of the same for you:

Some content of the file has been given here:

1. Talented people who possess knowledge, skills and ideas are among the scarce and intangible assets of the
company. To retain such talented employees, firms operating in international markets have to offer
I. Maximum levels of hierarchy.
II. Organizational policies that show concern for the environment.
III. A system for measurement of employee satisfaction.
IV. An explicit two-way contract specifying the responsibilities of employees and employer.
(a) Both (I) and (II) above
(b) (I), (II) and (III) above
(c) (I), (III) and (IV) above
(d) (II), (III) and (IV) above
(e) All (I), (II), (III) and (IV) above.

2. The guiding objective behind the International Monetary Fund (IMF) was to build a sound framework for
economic development and cooperation between the member nations. In order to achieve its purpose, which of
the following is/are the main operation(s) performed by IMF?
I. Surveillance.
II. Financial assistance.
III. Technical assistance.
IV. Human resource assistance.
(a) Only (I) above
(b) Both (I) and (II) above
(c) (I), (II) and (III) above
(d) (II), (III) and (IV) above
(e) All (I), (II), (III) and (IV) above.

3. Many market research organizations undertake psychographic segmentation to study lifestyles, personalities,
goals, motivations and values of people in various countries. Which of the following statements is true
regarding traditional segment of psychographic segments?
(a) These people are highly motivated towards success and lead a hectic life
(b) These people have already achieved some success and are on the way to achieve more
(c) These people are rooted to the past and do not ever want to change
(d) These people face constant financial and family pressure
(e) These people try to manage their values and at the same time, are open to change.

4. Wholly owned subsidiaries can be established in a foreign country in two ways – cross-border acquisitions and
greenfield operations. Which of the following statements are true regarding greenfield operations?
I. In this mode, firms start business from scratch in international markets.
II. This mode of entry faces both market risks as well as political risks.
III. This mode of entry offers firms the flexibility to choose their personnel.
IV. This mode of entry gives firms easy and quick access to the local markets.
(a) Both (I) and (II) above
(b) (I), (II) and (III) above
(c) (I), (III) and (IV) above
(d) (II), (III) and (IV) above
(e) All (I), (II), (III) and (IV) above.

i. e x e
5. A company can gain competitive advantage by realizing location economies. Economies of scale can be
achieved by locating
I. Manufacturing.
II. Distribution centers.
III. Customer service centers.
(a) Only (I) above
(b) Both (I) and (II) above
(c) Both (I) and (III) above
(d) Both (II) and (III) above
(e) All (I), (II) and (III) above.

6. The decisions taken by the international sales and the marketing managers may be classified into strategic,
operational or tactical categories. Which of the following is/are the strategic decision(s)?
I. Entry into new markets.
II. Product life cycles.
III. Distribution channels.
IV. Competitor tracking.
(a) Only (I) above
(b) Both (I) and (II) above
(c) (I), (II) and (III) above
(d) (I), (II) and (IV) above
(e) All (I), (II), (III) and (IV) above.

7. Markets for financial institutions in the developed countries have matured and financial institutions are under
increased pressure to diversify, explore new markets, use more technology or merge with other similar
organizations. To survive, banks need to
I. Utilize their traditional infrastructure to the maximum.
II. Reduce costs drastically.
III. Improve service quality.
IV. Deal with the changing global situations.
(a) Both (I) and (II) above
(b) (I), (II) and (III) above
(c) (I), (III) and (IV) above
(d) (II), (III) and (IV) above
(e) All (I), (II), (III) and (IV) above.

8. Which of the following refers to unconventional and creative attention grabbing direct advertising technique?
(a) Push advertisements
(b) Agent based forms of advertising
(c) Sponsorship
(d) Direct e-marketing
(e) Guerilla marketing.

9. After randomly choosing the beginning unit, every nth unit of population is selected, where the fixed interval ‘n’
is obtained by dividing the population by the sample size. This type of sampling method refers to
(a) Simple random sampling
(b) Systematic sampling
(c) Stratified sampling
(d) Area sampling
(e) Convenience sampling.

10.Creation of brand in itself is not enough. The brand also should be protected from piracy through registrations.
Which of the following statements is true regarding reverse engineering form of piracy?
(a) It means diluting the product quality and selling under the same name
(b) Products been modified and trademarks adapted
(c) It involves dismantling another firm’s product to learn about its special features
(d) It refers to false products sold in the same form and same trademark as the original
(e) Same product been sold in another country under separate name.

11.Which of the following statements is/are true regarding most of the third world countries/markets?
I. These countries have a shortage of goods and services.
II. There is a pressing need to expand production in a wide range of areas in these countries.
III. The third world markets are saturated giving less scope for international firms to explore.
(a) Only (I) above
(b) Both (I) and (II) above
(c) Both (I) and (III) above
(d) Both (II) and (III) above
(e) All (I), (II) and (III) above.

12.Rajasekhar G. Javalgi and Robert F. Wright developed a framework and a model for the pharmaceutical
companies entering international markets. Which of the following is not a mode of entry according to their
framework?
(a) Exporting
(b) Importing
(c) Licensing
(d) Joint ventures
(e) Establishing a subsidiary in the market.

13.Which of the following is explained as the number of characters that are assigned to objects, persons, states or
events as per the established rules?
(a) Research plan
(b) Questionnaire
(c) Sample survey
(d) Measurement
(e) Data.

14.There are inherent advantages with a long planning horizon. Which of the following is/are the advantage(s) of
long planning lead times that help Multi National Corporations (MNC’s) improve their promotional operations
in foreign markets?
I. It gives enough time to visit markets that need special attention.
II. It allows foreign advertising managers to internalize stated campaign objectives.
III. It is useful when a firm is going in for non-standardized campaigns.
IV. It allows manager to know the executives in their foreign affiliates.
(a) Only (I) above
(b) Both (I) and (II) above
(c) (I), (II) and (III) above
(d) (II), (III) and (IV) above
(e) All (I), (II), (III) and (IV) above.

15.Which of the following is not an important characteristic of international marketing product decisions that need
to be taken into consideration?
(a) Primary functional purpose
(b) Secondary purpose
(c) Durability and quality
(d) Method of operation
(e) Cost of the product.

16.Which of the following can be defined as “the act of evaluating and comparing the identified groups and then
selecting one or more of them as the prospects with the highest potential”?
(a) Targeting
(b) Segmenting
(c) Positioning
(d) Prospecting
(e) Branding.

17.Countries differ in the way they maintain their currency value in the foreign exchange market. Based on the level
of intervention, exchange rate regimes can be classified. Which of the following statements is true regarding
‘Hard Peg’?
(a) The government fixes the exchange rate, called the parity rate and defends it
(b) Permanently fixed rate, where government has no plans to change it
(c) Rates are periodically adjusted
(d) High frequency pegging day-to-day dollar or week-to-week pegging
(e) Low frequency pegging month-to-month pegging or quarter-to-quarter pegging.

18.A decentralized structure is seen in most organizations. As a result it is difficult for firms to make country teams
accept a global best practice quickly and voluntarily. In order to ensure that country teams adopt the best
practices, an individual or a team is given responsibility for a global brand. Which of the following statements
are true for providing responsibility to brand champion?
I. This is suitable for companies where the top executives have adequate brand knowledge and can formulate
brand strategy.
II. He monitors the building and maintenance of the brand worldwide.
III. It is appropriate when the company’s top managers consider brands their key assets.
IV. He creates a planning process or manages an existing process and then ensures that all country managers
use a similar process.
(a) Both (I) and (II) above
(b) Both (II) and (IV) above
(c) Both (III) and (IV) above
(d) (I), (II) and (III) above
(e) (I), (II) and (IV) above.

19.Which of the following refers to a multinational strategy, followed by the companies in setting up bases in some
key locations throughout the world and manage each of them as independent firms?
(a) Multinational mentality
(b) Personal control
(c) Decentralized federation
(d) Co-ordinated federation
(e) Administrative control.

20.Which of the following is/are the common complaint(s) of managers working for global companies?
I. Distributors have no clue how to increase sales.
II. Distributors don’t invest in business growth.
III. Distributors are too ambitious to dominate the marketplace.
IV. Distributors do not get adequate support from the company to increase sales.
(a) Only (I) above
(b) Both (I) and (II) above
(c) (I), (II) and (III) above
(d) (I), (III) and (IV) above
(e) All (I), (II), (III) and (IV) above.

21.According to the international product life cycle theory, innovations are generally made in the richer, more
developed countries. Which of the following are the reasons for innovations being largely confined to the capital
rich countries?
I. The environment in these countries is conducive to research and development.
II. Consumers in these countries generally have high incomes and ready to try new products.
III. In the initial stage of international product cycle it is beneficial to have the production centers located close
to the ultimate consumer.
IV. The cost of labor in these countries is relatively less encouraging the companies to produce innovative
products.
(a) Both (I) and (II) above
(b) (I), (II) and (III) above
(c) (I), (II) and (IV) above
(d) (II), (III) and (IV) above
(e) All (I), (II), (III) and (IV) above.

22.The institutional shareholders try to spread the message of Socially Responsible Investing (SRI) to the global
investors. Which of the following is/are true regarding the phases of SRI?
I. Investors shield away from companies that were involved in businesses like gambling and weapons and
tobacco manufacture.
II. Investors favored companies that took on the responsibility of conserving forests and wildlife.
III. Investors favor Multi National Corporations (MNC’s) that engage in sustainable activities such as recycling
and replacing of non-renewable fossil fuels with renewable fuels.
IV. Investors favor companies providing high returns to the shareholders even in any situations of financial
crisis.
(a) Only (I) above
(b) Both (I) and (II) above
(c) (I), (II) and (III) above
(d) (II), (III) and (IV) above
(e) All (I), (II), (III) and (IV) above.

23.When a company purchases a good from an associated company and sells that to another unrelated or
independent company, that sales price is called as
(a) Comparable uncontrolled price
(b) Market based transfer
(c) Cost plus
(d) Transfer at cost
(e) Resale price.

24.There are various theories of international trade. Which of the following are the limitations of the theory of
absolute advantage?
I. The country which has an absolute advantage in all products need not trade at all, while the country which
does not have absolute advantage in any products will not be in a position to trade at all.
II. Countries should produce and export surpluses of goods in which they have absolute advantage and buy
whatever else they need from other countries.
III. It assumes that the transportation costs involved in selling a commodity in a country other than the one in
which it is produced are either non-existent or insignificant.
IV. It assumes that the prices are comparable across countries.
(a) Both (I) and (II) above
(b) (I), (II) and (III) above
(c) (I), (III) and (IV) above
(d) (II), (III) and (IV) above
(e) All (I), (II), (III) and (IV) above.

25.To provide banking services to their clients abroad, banks must have a presence in the foreign country. Which of
the following is/are the way(s) undertaken by banks to be in foreign markets?
I. They may open their branches in foreign countries.
II. They may form agreements or have a stock interest in a foreign bank abroad.
III. They may set up a foreign department in their bank and operate through their foreign correspondent.
IV. They may introduce internet banking through which they can operate their functions.
(a) Only (I) above
(b) Both (I) and (II) above
(c) (I), (II) and (III) above
(d) (II), (III) and (IV) above
(e) All (I), (II), (III) and (IV) above.

26.Which of the following arises on the basis of accounting for transactions between trading companies and where
the holding company in a country needs to include the accounts of its subsidiary in its balance sheet?
(a) Futures contracts
(b) Forward contracts
(c) Economic exposure
(d) Transaction exposure
(e) Translation exposure.

27.According to transparency international, corruption is the misuse of public power for private gain. Which of the
following statements are true regarding ‘grand corruption’?
I. It is the distortion of decision-making in matters of economic significance.
II. It is often domestic in nature and falls within jurisdiction.
III. It has both an economic and moral impact on the society.
IV. It is a common practice for the decision-making authority to seek contribution to government funds.
(a) Both (I) and (II) above
(b) (I), (II) and (III) above
(c) (I), (III) and (IV) above
(d) (II), (III) and (IV) above
(e) All (I), (II), (III) and (IV) above.

28.The two important sources of data in domestic or international market research are primary and secondary
sources. Which of the following statements is/are true regarding secondary data?
I. Secondary data is collected for a particular purpose.
II. Secondary data is easy to obtain.
III. Secondary data is not very costly.
IV. Secondary data is not always reliable.
(a) Only (I) above
(b) Both (I) and (II) above
(c) (I), (II) and (III) above
(d) (II), (III) and (IV) above
(e) All (I), (II), (III) and (IV) above.

29.Which of the following are products that are consumed during production and delivery of the product but they
do not become part of the final product?
(a) Component parts
(b) Business services
(c) Capital equipment
(d) Accessory equipment
(e) Consumable supplies.

30.Balance of Payments (BoP) is said to be favorable when receipts from foreigners exceed payments to them and
unfavorable when payments exceed receipts. Disequilibrium is caused by random variations in trade and
sometimes, fluctuations in production of primary goods such as agricultural goods. Which of the following are
the types of disequilibrium caused in the BoP?
I. Cyclic disequilibrium.
II. Secular disequilibrium.
III. Seasonal disequilibrium.
IV. Structural disequilibrium.
(a) Both (I) and (II) above
(b) (I), (II) and (III) above
(c) (I), (II) and (IV) above
(d) (II), (III) and (IV) above
(e) All (I), (II), (III) and (IV) above.

Section B : Caselets (50 Marks)
• This section consists of questions with serial number 1 – 7.
• Answer all questions.
• Marks are indicated against each question.
• Detailed explanations should form part of your answer.
• Do not spend more than 110 - 120 minutes on Section B.

Read the caselet carefully and answer the following questions:
1. With respect to the caselet, discuss the growth of Wal-Mart from a store in Rogers to
become the biggest retail chain in the world. ( 6 marks)

2. According to Green, Barcley, and Rayons, the competitive position, specifically the
ability and competencies of a firm to realize its objectives in attaining or sustaining
a competitive advantage is affected by the timing of entry of the firm. What are the
various criteria on which the timing of entry in international markets depends? ( 8 marks)

3. For the world’s largest retailing company – Wal-Mart Inc (Wal-Mart), the German
market was proving difficult to crack. By 2003, even after 5 years of entering
Germany, Wal-Mart was making losses. Examine the various reasons for the failure
of Wal-Mart in Germany. ( 7 marks)

For the world’s largest retailing company – Wal-Mart Inc (Wal-Mart), the German
market was proving difficult to crack. By 2003, even after 5 years of entering
Germany, Wal-Mart was making losses. Though Wal-Mart did not reveal these
figures, analysts estimated losses of around $200-300 million per annum in Germany,
over the five-year period. According to analysts, the main reason for Wal-Mart’s
losses was its failure to understand German culture and the shopping habits of
Germans.
Though Wal-Mart was famous the world over for its Every Day Low Pricing
(EDLP), which turned it into the world’s number one retailer, it could not make an
impact in Europe’s most price-sensitive market – Germany.
Wal-Mart also ran into series of problems with German regulatory authorities for its
pricing strategies and faced considerable opposition from German suppliers to its
centralized distribution system. It had problems with its German workers too.
However, Wal-Mart was not the only retailer to do badly in Germany in the 1990s.
German retailers too faced losses in the period because of the flat economy and rising
unemployment.
Though Wal-Mart was confident that there would be a turnaround in its fortunes in
the German market by late 2003, this opinion was not shared by most independent
analysts.
In 1962, Sam Walton (Walton) and his brother opened the first Wal-Mart store in
Rogers (Arkansas), USA. In the first year of its operations, the store registered sales
of over $1 million. Initially, the Waltons concentrated on opening stores in small
towns and introduced innovative concepts such as self-service.
By 1967, Wal-Mart had 24 stores with sales of $12.6 million. Encouraged by the
early success of Wal-Mart, Sam Walton expanded Wal-Mart’s operations to
Oklahoma and Missouri in 1968. In the following year, Wal-Mart was incorporated
as a company under the name Wal-Mart Stores Inc.
In 1970, Wal-Mart established its first distribution center in Bentonville, Arkansas. It
floated its first public issue the same year. Wal-Mart continued to grow in the 1970s,
benefiting from its highly automated distribution system, which reduced shipping
costs and time, and its computerized inventory system, which speeded up the
checkout and reordering of stocks.
In 1977, Wal-Mart acquired 16 Mohr-Value stores based in Michigan and Illinois. In
1978, it purchased the Hutcheson Shoe Company, and later set up pharmacy, auto
service center, and jewelry divisions. By 1980, Wal-Mart had 276 stores with annual
sales of $1.4 billion. The number of stores increased to 640 with annual sales of $4.5
billion and profits of over $200 million by 1984. In the 1980s, strong customer
demand in small towns drove the rapid growth of Wal-Mart.
Walton said, “When we arrived in these small towns offering low prices every day,
customer satisfaction guaranteed, and hours that were realistic for the way people
wanted to shop, we passed right by that old variety of store competition, with its 45%
mark ups, limited selection and limited hours.” In 1988, Walton appointed David
Glass (Glass) as CEO of Wal-Mart. Soon after taking over, Glass started Hypermart
USA.
It was originally a joint venture with Cullum Companies (a Dallas-based supermarket
chain). In the following year Wal-Mart bought out Cullum’s stake in the venture. The
Hypermart was a discount store/supermarket chain, which sprawled over 200,000 sq
ft. It featured branch banks, fast food outlets, photo developers and playrooms for
shoppers’children. This concept was later retooled as Wal-Mart’s Supercenters.
Wal-Mart had two types of divisions – Retail divisions and Specialty divisions. Retail
divisions were further classified into – Wal-Mart Stores, Sam’s Clubs, Neighborhood
Market, International and walmart.com. The specialty division was divided into –
Tire & Lube Express, Wal-Mart Optical, Wal-Mart Pharmacy, Wal-Mart Vacations
and Wal-Mart’s Used Fixture Auctions.
Most American companies entering Europe started with the UK due to the
similarities between the US and the UK in culture, language and legal environment.
Wal-Mart, however, decided to enter Germany first. Analysts were critical of this
decision as the German retailing industry was experiencing slow growth rates and
retailers were indulging in price wars which eroded margins badly. Additionally,
Germany had high labour costs, high real estate prices and a very inflexible business
environment.
Wal-Mart expanded its presence into Germany through acquisitions. It acquired the
21-hypermarket stores of Wertkauf in 1997. The Wertkauf stores offered both food
and general merchandise to the customers. Wal-Mart sources said that Wertkauf
stores would provide the necessary footage in the German market. However, as
Wertkauf covered only southwestern Germany, it failed to provide the required
market penetration to Wal-Mart in Germany. In 1998, Wal-Mart acquired Interspar’s
74 hypermarket stores to raise the total number of Wal-Mart stores in Germany to 95.
With the acquisition of Interspar’s stores, Wal-Mart became the fourth largest
hypermarket retailer in Germany.
Soon after acquiring the stores, Wal-Mart hurried through with their renovation and
put its brandname on them to make sure its EDLP message went across. But it was
unable to cash in on its EDLP selling point, chiefly because of the strong competition
from German retailers. Whenever Wal-Mart lowered its prices on commodities,
German retailers such as Aldi, Lidl, Rewe and Edeka also lowered their prices to
keep their customers, so Wal-Mart found it difficult to get a foothold.
Wal-Mart faced several problems on the legal front as well. It was accused of
breaching various German laws. The company was accused of having violated
Section (IV) (2) of ‘Act against Restraints of Competition’ – (Gesetz gegen
Wettbewerbsbeschrankungen or GWB) and Section 335a of the ‘Commercial Act’
(Handelsgesetzbuch or HGB). Section (IV) (2) of GWB forbids companies ‘with
superior market power in relation to small and medium-sized competitors’ from
lowering their prices and engaging in price wars with small companies. Such large
companies were allowed to lower prices only after providing justification for the
lower prices.
Apart from the operational and regulatory problems, Wal-Mart also faced cultural
problems in Germany. It found it difficult to integrate the two companies (Wertkauf
and Interspar), which it had acquired. The companies had completely different work
cultures; while Interspar had decentralized operations with independent regional
units, Wertkauf was highly centralized with the head office making all decisions.
Addtionally, Wal-Mart found it difficult to integrate the two companies’ cultures with
its own.
Even after five years of entering the German market, Wal-Mart had not made a
significant impact in the German retail industry. Wal-Mart reported losses over all the
four years up to 2002 in its German operations. It was reported that between 1999-
2002 Wal-Mart’s sales declined by 5% on average. Increasing costs also pushed up
losses for the company.

Caselet 2
Read the caselet carefully and answer the following questions:
4. “The Sweden-based Inter IKEA Systems BV (IKEA) was ranked 42 by
BusinessWeek magazine in its list of Top 100 global brands for the year 2005. In
January 2005, IKEA was placed third in BrandChannel’s fourth annual Reader’s
Choice Awards for the global brand with the most impact in 2004. According to the
BrandChannel rankings, IKEA was the #1 brand in Europe and Africa.” In this
regard, explain how IKEA built such a strong brand in the global market. ( 7 marks)

5. IKEA’s target market was the global middle class which shared buying habits.
Explain the importance of targeting in the international marketing. Also, discuss the
criteria for targeting global markets. ( 7 marks)

The Sweden-based Inter IKEA Systems BV (IKEA) was ranked 42 by BusinessWeek
magazine in its list of Top 100 global brands for the year 2005. In January 2005,
IKEA was placed third in BrandChannel’s fourth annual Reader’s Choice Awards for
the global brand with the most impact in 2004. According to the BrandChannel
rankings, IKEA was the #1 brand in Europe and Africa. IKEA was the world’s largest
furniture retailer that specialized in stylish but inexpensive Scandinavian designed
furniture. IKEA’s success was attributed to its vast experience in the furniture retail
market, its product differentiation and cost leadership. The company sold its furniture
in kits, to be assembled by the customers at home.
In addition to furniture, IKEA also sold utility items such as utensils, hooks, clips,
stands, etc. IKEA’s founder Ingvar Kamprad (Kamprad) had built an international
furniture chain of 226 stores in Europe, Africa, Asia and the US. For fiscal year
2004-05, the company generated revenues of US$ 17.9 billion, a 15% increase over
the previous fiscal year. IKEA held a market share of not more than 10% in the
markets in which it operated. In spite of this, it had been successful in almost all
countries, because of public awareness of the IKEA brand.
Kamprad established IKEA in 1943 at the age of seventeen. He came up with the
name IKEA by combining the first letters of his name (Ingvar Kamprad), followed by
the first letters of the farm and village he grew in (Elmtaryd and Agunnaryd). IKEA
began in a shed that was just two meters square in size.
Kamprad started his business by buying pens, Christmas cards, matches, cigarette
lighters, nylon stockings and other items in bulk. He sold these items to the residents
of Smaland at a reasonable price, but still made healthy profits. To save more money,
Kamprad would piggyback his packages on the trucks that delivered milk. IKEA
soon started making money. In 1945, Kamprad started promoting business through
mail order catalogues as conducting individual sales calls became impossible.
Furniture was introduced in IKEA’s product portfolio in the year 1947. By 1951, the
furniture sales had increased so much that Kamprad decided to discontinue all other
products and concentrate solely on selling furniture that was classy and low priced at
the same time.
In the same year, the first IKEA furniture catalogue was issued and the first IKEA
furniture shop was opened in 1953 at Almhult in Sweden. The first IKEA store was
opened at Almhult in 1958. The opening of the showroom was an important
milestone in the growth of IKEA as customers could, for the first time, see and touch
the furniture before giving an order.
By visiting the showroom, customers could review three dimensions of its products –
function, quality and low price – before making their purchases. In 1956, IKEA
launched its most successful product – Flat pack furniture. It was invented by
accident when an IKEA employee Gillis Lundgren (Lundgren) realized that a bulky
wooden table could fit into a car only when its legs were removed. He put this
observation to work and thus was born furniture that could be easily dismantled and
rearranged with the aid of accessories such as nails and screws. Lundgren
subsequently went on to establish the design team at IKEA that created a bookshelf
named Billy, and a sofa called Klippan, the two globally best-selling furniture pieces
from IKEA.

This technology brought IKEA two distinct advantages: it made furniture easy to
carry (for both the buyer and the company), and it also reduced overall costs as
buyers could assemble the products at home using instructions provided by the
company.
IKEA was known for its contemporary yet affordable furniture, even after twenty
years of the exit of Kamprad. Though Kamprad had long ceded day to day
involvement in the company’s activities, his vision and thoughts were deeply rooted
in IKEA’s culture.
Kamprad’s humble beginnings (he was the son of a farmer) had created a unique
IKEA culture that was founded on respect for money and an innovative mindset.
Kamprad was known for his frugal habits. He flew economy class, he would take the
metro to work, drive a ten-year-old second-hand Volvo and avoid designer suits.
This attitude trickled down to the co-workers, who would ensure minimal wastage
and cost cutting at every level. As a result, IKEA came up with products that were
aesthetically designed and were still available at affordable prices. This aspect greatly
enhanced the brand image of IKEA, which was perceived as a company that believed
in social equality.
IKEA stores were usually located outside urban areas, isolated from other shops. This
was done intentionally so that IKEA could create a complete shopping experience for
customers.
The IKEA products were themselves beautifully crafted and appealing, and even
their stores were so constructed as to enthrall shoppers. The blue-and-yellow
buildings were generally 300,000 square feet in size and each store stocked about
7,000 items, from kitchen cabinets to candlesticks.
IKEA targeted middle class customers worldwide. IKEA made shopping easy for
customers. For example, right at the entrance of the store, customers could drop their
kids at the playroom which had many types of safe play equipment, and then shop on
their own in a leisurely manner. The stores were constructed in the form of a circle,
to allow shoppers to view all sections of the store.
According to IKEA, the company’s target market was the global middle class which
shared buying habits. IKEA’s Billy bookcase, Lack side table and Ivar storage system
were best-sellers worldwide. The customer spending pattern was also similar across
countries. Despite these similarities, IKEA realized that to strengthen its presence in
the global market, it was necessary to localize. For instance in China, IKEA produced
250,000 plastic placemats in 2005 to honor the year of rooster.
A big contributing factor in the growth of the IKEA brand was its ability to weave a
story around itself. For instance, before the opening of its store at Atlanta, USA, in
June 2005, IKEA invited locals to apply for the post of Ambassador of Kul (‘Fun’ in
Swedish). The five participants had to write an essay on why they deserved
US$2,000 in gift vouchers.
IKEA’s advertising campaigns were based on unique marketing conditions and
cultural sensibilities of each country, which varied significantly across markets. For
example, European advertisements, especially in the UK, were more straight-forward
than those in North America, which were generally more witty. IKEA was present in
some countries such as Canada, Australia and Germany for over twenty five years
while in countries such as the US, Britain and Italy, it had been around for only a
little more than a decade. Over the years, IKEA had worked with different
advertising agencies to bring out some of the most creative and unconventional
television spots across the globe. For these reasons, an IKEA account was considered
a choice catch as it allowed the agency the freedom to explore some interesting and
unexplored ideas.

Read the caselet carefully and answer the following questions:
6. With respect to the caselet, discuss the various strategies adopted by Tommy Hilfiger
to grow as a one of the top international brand. ( 7 marks)

7. Discuss the various pricing strategies that global companies implement to achieve
their pricing objectives. ( 8 marks)

Since the market is in the international orientation, the advertisers should keep in
mind the differences that are distinct between and among the target market from
different cultural backgrounds which may significantly affect the effectivity of the
campaign. The fact is, there may be ideas that will not be applicable across the
diverse target market population. Studies on the relationship of consumer behavior
and their personal values and cultural orientation as well as their beliefs on certain
principles, the dispositions they hold and side they take on political, gender and
social problems and issues should be duly accorded.
Most successful international brands can clearly define their target consumer without
a reference to nationality or ethnic background. Tommy Hilfiger is targeting a
consumer that is international in nature and is cosmopolitan to an extent. It does not
necessarily mean that they attract only the younger crowd. Many retail brands like
Brooks Brother and Austin Reed attract consumer from an elder age group across
countries for their classic and sophisticated fashion items. Tommy Hilfiger is
engaged in principally one industry segment, the design, importation and distribution
of men’s sportswear and children’s wear (Daily News Record, 2003). Accordingly,
no information is being furnished herein or in the accompanying financial statements
relating to industry segments of the company.
Tommy Hilfiger, through its subsidiaries, designs, sources and markets designer
men’s sportswear and boys wear, including woven shirts, knit shirts, pants,
swimwear, sweaters, outerwear and athletic wear. These offerings are complemented
by collections of men’s tailored clothing, dress shirts, denim products, neckwear,
socks, underwear, belts, small leather goods, sleepwear, robes, golf wear, foot wear,
sunglasses, prescription eyewear, women’s casual wear and men’s and women’s
fragrances, among others, bearing the Tommy Hilfiger® trademark, which are
produced and sold pursuant to certain licensing arrangements. Tommy Hilfiger is the
company’s principal designer and provides leadership and direction for all aspects of
the design process. The company’s sportswear is designed to combine classic
American styling with unique details and fit to give time honored basics a fresh and
updated look for customers who desire high quality, designer clothes at competitive
prices (Daily News Record, 2003).
In addition to continuing to expand the in-store shop program, the company plans to
grow by broadening its range of product offerings, both in-house and through
licensing arrangements, and by expanding its channels of distribution. Through the
expansion of its product lines, the company believes it will serve a wider variety of
customer needs. The company has introduced new products, a women’s fragrance
pursuant to its license with Aramis, Inc., a division of Estee Lauder Companies,
prescription eyewear with Liberty Optical, footwear with the Stride Rite Corporation
and women’s casual wear marketed under a license with Pepe Jeans London
Corporation (Associated Press, 2003).
Wholesale distribution is centralized in a 360,000 square foot New Jersey facility to
which all products are shipped. The facility is operated and principally staffed by an
independent contractor who charges the company on the basis of the number of items
processed, subject to a minimum annual fee. The company has the right, at any time
during the contract period, to terminate the distribution agreement by making a
specified payment. In addition, the company leases a 200,000 square foot facility in
New Jersey for retail distribution. The company believes that these distribution
facilities are adequate for the company’s current level of sales, and provide the
company with enough space and flexibility to support the continued growth of the
company’s business (Bryant, 2003).
In July 1991, the company was granted an exclusive license to sell the company’s
products in Canada. The term of the agreement is 10 years and is renewable at the

option of the licensee subject to specified volume limitations and other conditions. In
addition, the company has granted an exclusive distributorship to an unaffiliated
Panamanian company to distribute the company’s products in Central America,
Venezuela, Columbia, Chile, Ecuador and most of the nations of the Caribbean basin,
and even to India. In May 1995, the company was again granted the license to
distribute its products in Mexico for 3 years term and is renewable at the option of
the licensee. On February 1, 1997, the company entered into an agreement with Pepe
Jeans London Corporation to distribute the company’s men and boy’s sport wears
(excluding jeans wear and jeans related apparel) throughout the European Market
(Associated Press, 2003).
All pricing decisions are made at the Company’s corporate headquarters. The
Company’s pricing strategy is designed to provide superior quality and value appeal
by offering competitive prices on fashion from better national brands. The Company
has effectively been able to generate sales from promotions with special pricing of
limited duration. The Company’s management information systems provide timely
sales and gross margin reports that identify sales and gross margins by item and by
store and provide management with the information and flexibility to adjust prices
and inventory levels as necessary. Tommy Hilfiger products are available in the range
of $40-$500 globally. Tommy Hilfiger products are mainly sold in the US market
through leading retail chains such as Macy’s. Tommy Hilfiger has a huge 20,000-sq
ft retail space in some Macy’s chains in the US (Bryant, 2003).
Most fashion pundits will agree that the secret to developing an upscale brand begins
with creating a luxury-priced collection that sets the pricing, segmenting and
targeting of the lower-priced labels below it. Many argue that by developing a midrange
street wear collection first, Tommy created a consumer perception of the brand
as a more expensive street wear collection, but not necessarily a designer label.
Tommy’s strategy may have worked better by creating a black label luxury collection
first, getting it into high-end retail stores, generating a strong designer positioning
and creating a certain luxury feel. Once established, the company would have been
well positioned to develop lower-tiered labels targeted to other audiences and retail
stores. This was further compounded by Tommy’s struggle with global trademark
infringement and counterfeiting issues. These problems gave Hilfiger that “sold
everywhere to everyone” mindset that tends to erode a brand over time (Associated
Press, 2003).

Section C : Applied Theory (20 Marks)
• This section consists of questions with serial number 8 – 9.
• Answer all questions.
• Marks are indicated against each question.
• Do not spend more than 25 -30 minutes on Section C.
8. Explain the principles of the World Health Organization (WTO) which form the
basis of the multilateral trading system. Also, list out the various benefits
derived from the WTO.
( 10 marks)

9. ‘Online communities are groups of people who come together on the Internet to
share a common interest’. What are the different kinds of online communities?
Also, explain the benefits of such communities for companies.
( 10 marks)
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Default Re: ICFAI University, MBA, International Management II previous years question papers

As you are looking for the ICFAI University, MBA, International Management question paper so here it is as follows
ICFAI University, MBA, International Management Question Paper
Section A : Basic Concepts (30 Marks)
• This section consists of questions with serial number 1 - 30.
• Answer all questions.
• Each question carries one mark.
• Maximum time for answering Section A is 30 Minutes.
1. As per exchange control regulations, licenses are issued for import of goods into India for ______ value.
(a) FOB
(b) C&F
(c) CIF
(d) FOB value plus 21.125%
(e) Cost plus 20%.
2. Which of the following is not an external hedging technique?
(a) Forwards
(b) Exposure netting
(c) Futures
(d) Options
(e) Money markets.
3. The system in which the exchange rates are determined by the demand and supply position for the currencies in
the foreign exchange market is known as
(a) Target zone arrangement system
(b) Crawling peg system
(c) Fixed exchange rate system
(d) Floating exchange rate system
(e) Currency board system.
4. Dumping means
(a) Destroying the goods to create scarcity
(b) Throwing the goods into the sea to create scarcity
(c) Donating the goods to least developed countries as charity
(d) Selling the goods at actual cost
(e) Selling the goods below the cost.
5. An exporter requested his banker to quote a rate for his receivable of $10,000. The banker agrees to quote the
rate relying on the inter bank rate for dollar that is Rs.48.75/77$ by loading a margin of 0.15% on the rate. The
rate quoted by the banker is
(a) Rs.48.68/$
(b) Rs.48.70/$
(c) Rs.48.82/$
(d) Rs.48.84/$
(e) Rs.48.83/$.
6. Which form of purchasing power parity refers to the Law of One Price?
(a) Numerical form
(b) Relative form
(c) Accounting form
(d) Absolute form
(e) Expectations form.
7. Under which of the following International Commercial Terms (INCOTERMS), the seller places the goods at his
premises at the disposal of the buyer or any other named place, say factory, warehouse etc?
(a) Cost and Freight (CFR)
(b) Carriage paid to (CPT)
(c) Ex works (EXW)
(d) Free carrier (FCA)
(e) Free on Board (FOB).
8. For compilation of Balance of Payment(BoP) India follows the principles laid down by the
I. The Income Tax Act.
II. The Foreign Trade (Development and Regulation) Act.
III. The IMF manual.
IV. The Foreign Exchange Management Act.
(a) Only (I) above
(b) Only (II) above
(c) Only (III) above
(d) Both (I) and (IV) above
(e) Both (II) and (IV) above.
9. Which of the following statements is true when a country has a current account surplus in its balance of
payment account?
(a) Country is not a net lender to the rest of the world
(b) Country would need not borrow from outside to build-up its productive capabilities in order to achieve
high rates of growth
(c) Country is living above its means
(d) It is not beneficial for a developing country
(e) Country is consuming as much as it is producing.
10.Consider the following rates quoted in Chennai forex market:
Rs./€ : 62.36/38
€/£ : 1.1761/63
The synthetic quotes of Rs./€ are
(a) 73.34/73.38
(b) 53.02/53.03
(c) 0.0301/0.0313
(d) 53.80/53.84
(e) 73.75/73.78.
11.If there are no barriers to trade among the member countries and the external barriers for non-members are also
common, then this form of trading block falls under
(a) Free trade area
(b) Common Market
(c) Customs Union
(d) Economic Union
(e) Autarky.
12.Which of the following is false about a forward contract in foreign exchange?
(a) A forward contract can be either outright forward or option forward
(b) It is an agreement where the parties agree to buy or sell a currency at a future date
(c) The future date should be beyond one month from the date of contract
(d) The price of the currency is fixed at the time of contract
(e) The terms of delivery and payments are also fixed at the time of contract.
13.Bank of Misr (BOM), Cairo is having an euro currency account with Commerz Bank, Frankfurt. When Citizens
Bank of Canada, Vancouver refers to this account of BOM, while corresponding with Commerz Bank, Frankfurt,
it would refer as
(a) Shadow account
(b) Vostro account
(c) Nostro account
(d) Loro account
(e) Mirror account.
14.Economic exposure can be managed by which of the following techniques?
I. Forwards.
II. Futures.
III. Market Selection.
IV. Product Mix.
(a) Both (I) and (II) above
(b) Both (I) and (III) above
(c) Both (I) and (IV) above
(d) Both (II) and (III) above
(e) Both (III) and (IV) above.
15.Consider the following:
One year euro interest rate is 5% (compounded quarterly)
One year dollar interest rate is 3% (compounded quarterly)
The Spot exchange rate is $1.2788/€.
According to interest rate parity, the 6 months forward exchange rate is
(a) $1.2725/€
(b) $1.2915/€
(c) $1.2824/€
(d) $1.2919/€
(e) $1.3077/€.
16.As per the exchange control regulations, an exporter is required to submit all the shipping documents
evidencing export to an authorized dealer within
(a) 3 days from the date of shipment
(b) 7 days from the date of shipment
(c) 15 days from the date of shipment
(d) 21 days from the date of shipment
(e) 30 days from the date of shipment.
17.The letter of credit which can be cancelled by the issuing bank at the request of the applicant without the consent
of the beneficiary is called
(a) Deferred Payment letter of credit
(b) Transferable letter of credit
(c) Non-transferable letter of credit
(d) Revolving letter of credit
(e) Revocable letter of credit.
18.Which of the following advances is a pre-shipment credit?
(a) Advances against receivables from the Government of India
(b) Advances against retention money relating to exports
(c) Advances against approved deemed exports
(d) Packing credit
(e) Advance against export bills.
19.Which of the following statements is true in case of a direct quote?
(a) Exchange margin is to be added to the bid rate and ask rate
(b) Exchange margin is to be added to the bid rate and deducted from the ask rate
(c) Exchange margin is to be deducted from the bid rate and the ask rate
(d) Exchange margin is to be deducted from the bid rate and added to the ask rate
(e) Exchange margin is to be added to the bid rate only.
20.Consider the following rates:
Rs./$ Spot 45.98/45.99
3 months 22/21
The annualized percentage discount on dollar for 3 months will be
(a) 1.57%
(b) 1.24%
(c) 1.73%
(d) 1.74%
(e) 1.87%.
21.Which of the following theories states that new products are developed as a result of technological innovations
and trade patterns are determined by the market structure and the phase in a new product’s life?
(a) Theory of Comparative Advantage
(b) Theory of Absolute Advantage
(c) Imitation Gap Theory
(d) International Product Life Cycle Theory
(e) Heckscher-Ohlin Model.
22.The exposure that arises from the need to convert values of assets and liabilities denominated in a foreign
currency into the domestic currency is called
(a) Transaction exposure
(b) Transformation exposure
(c) Translation exposure
(d) Operating exposure
(e) Financial exposure.
23.When ‘Suzuki’ a Japanese company is floating USD denominated bonds in New York, the bond is known as
(a) Samurai bond
(b) Shogun bond
(c) Shibosai bond
(d) Yankee bond
(e) Geisha bond.
24.In balance of payments statement, short term inflows and outflows of capital are recorded in
(a) Current account
(b) Capital account
(c) Official reserves account
(d) Errors and omissions account
(e) Transfer payments account.
25.An Indian company based in Mumbai needs short term funds of Rs.50 million for a period of 3 months. The
company collected the following information from its banker
Spot :Rs/$ : 45.90/92
3 months forward : 15/17 paise
If the company decides to borrow dollar for the purpose, the amount of dollars required to borrow is
(a) $10,88,850
(b) $10,89,325
(c) $10,85,776
(d) $10,84,834
(e) $10,85,305.
26.Which of the following is not correct?
(a) Important function of the IMF is to provide reserve credit to the member countries facing temporary
balance of payment problem
(b) Oil facility is a type of IMF lending
(c) International Development Association (IDA) endeavors to finance those projects in developing
countries, which may not be financially profitable
(d) International Finance Corporation (IFC) insists on government guarantee for financing
projects
(e) IFC helps the development of private sector in different countries.
27.Which of the following is true under a currency board system?
(a) The interest rates are automatically set by the market mechanism
(b) When there is a higher demand for the anchor currency, the reserves with the currency board gets
enhanced
(c) Lending to either the government or the domestic banks by the currency board is
allowed
(d) The board can act as the lender of the last resort
(e) Exchange rates are unstable.
28.Which of the following statements is not true as per the exchange control regulations governing imports?
(a) Normally remittances against imports shall be completed within 6 months from the date of shipment
(b) Foreign exchange for import payment can be sold to persons in Nepal or Bhutan
(c) Goods imported from Nepal or Bhutan against Letter of Credit (LC), payment will be made in Indian
Rupees and LC will be treated as Domestic LC
(d) Authorized dealers can deliver the import documents to the holders of letter of authority
(e) An importer shall hold an Import-Export Code Number allotted by Director General of Foreign Trade.
29.If a country has a Balance of Payments surplus and the Central Bank is following floating exchange rate system,
then the foreign exchange rate for its currency would
(a) Rise, its exports would increase and its imports would decrease
(b) Rise, its exports would decrease and its imports would increase
(c) Fall, its exports would increase and its imports would decrease
(d) Fall, its exports would decrease and its imports would increase
(e) Be stable.
30.Under which of the following facilities IMF extends help to prevent countries, suffering due to price shocks?
(a) Extended Facility
(b) Standby arrangement
(c) Buffer Stock Financing Facility
(d) Compensating Financing Facility
(e) Supplementary Financing Facility.
Section B : Problems/Caselets (50 Marks)
• This section consists of questions with serial number 1 – 6.
• Answer all questions.
• Marks are indicated against each question.
• Detailed workings/explanations should form part of your answer.
• Do not spend more than 110 - 120 minutes on Section B.
1. Ayur Pharmaceuticals, Kottakal, a Kerala firm has exported drugs valuing
US$100,000 to Nigeria on 01-10-2008 on the condition that the importer
undertakes to pay the bill within180 days from the date of shipment. The importer
confirmed that the payment would be made on 31st March, 2009, 180th day from the
date of shipment. The bank charges interest @8.5% on export bills discounted from
customers.
The exchange rates and interest rates prevailing on 01-10-2008 are as under
Exchange rates Spot Rs./$ 48.60/62
6 months forward 48.90/92
Interest rates Mumbai Rs. 8% - 9%
New York $ 3% - 4%
The exporter needs rupee funds immediately to execute another export order.
You are required to determine which of the following options ensure maximum
inflow of rupee without exposing the company to exchange risk:
a. Forward cover.
( 3
marks
)
b. Money market cover.
( 5
marks
)
2. A Multinational Dairy products manufacturing company in Copenhagen, Denmark,
proposes to invest its surplus funds of DKr 20 million for six months. The Treasury
Manager has collected the following information from his banker to invest in euro
and Pound Sterling currencies including that of home currency to earn more interest
income. The company does not want to expose the investment to exchange risk, for
that the company will take cover in the forward market.
Spot DKr/US$ 4.7960/4.7966
US$/£ 1.9639/ 1.9642
6 months forward DKr/US$ 4.8436/ 4.8442
US$/£ 1.9495/1.9497
6 months interest rates (p.a.)
US $ : 3.20% – 3.50%
DKr : 5.40% – 5.60%
£ : 6.20% – 6.50%
You are required to determine the currency in which the company should invest to
have more returns. ( 12marks)
Caselet 1
Read the caselet carefully and answer the following questions:
3. The US economy is suffering from recession on one hand, whereas the emerging
Asian economies are reeling under inflation on the other hand. In this context,
explain the probable impact of ‘Global Inflation’ on the US and other Asian
economies. ( 7 marks)
4. Elucidate the measures taken by the monetary authorities to contain the inflation in
India. ( 8 marks)
The US economy is a powerful force in world trade. A slowdown is bound to
generate global ripples. For years, the US has been importing deflation to its shores
from surplus labor markets such as India and China. Now that indigenous inflation
has risen in those markets, the economic utility has changed. US economy is
expected to grow at 0.50% in 2008 as compared to 2.20% in 2007. Asia (including
Japan) and European growth will also slow as result of US recession. Asian growth
is expected to grow at 6.20% in 2008 (from 7.40% in 2007) while European
economic growth is expected to decline sharply, by 1.25 percentage points to 1.50%
in 2008. India and Chinese GDP growth rates will fall marginally by 0.50% in 2008
(from 2007 growth). Japan and Australian growth rates will also slowdown in 2008.
The earlier theory of Asia and other emerging nation growth being delinked from a
US recession has failed. In fact, Asia and other emerging nations have been affected
by a US led recession.
Global inflation has risen mainly due to unstoppable rise in crude oil prices and
sharp rise in food prices. Global central banks have to choose between inflation and
growth. The US Federal Reserve has chosen growth while the European Central
Bank, the Reserve Bank of India, Chinese Central Bank and other central banks
have give preference to inflation in their monetary policy decisions. Inflation rise
may not overheat the global economy in the short-term. In the long-term, crude oil
prices will be the key. As and when crude oil prices fall sharply for a sustained
period of time, global economy will overheat. If US economy moves away from
recession, India and Chinese growth rates will soar and global growth rates will rise
sharply which could overheat the global economy. Everything will depend on how
the quickly the world emerges from the energy price shock and food price shock it
is experiencing. The US recession has not had a major impact on commodities
consumption outside of the US, and rather, the big fear seems to be inflation, more
specifically, rising energy and food prices. Emerging market economies, where
spiraling food and energy prices make up a larger component of the CPI, are most at
risk of `overheating' and might use tighter monetary policy as a balance. However,
the world economy is not out of the woods yet. The full effect of the US recession
could make for a period of much slower growth for the world economy in the
coming few years.
Oil and fuel prices have found new plateaus. They're not likely to return to their
previous levels unless there's a significant shift in supply and/or a diminution in
demand. It's hard to grow an economy nowadays without relying upon oil. Longterm
fundamentals are bullish due to supply constraints and ever rising demand.
There is lack of new discovery in crude oil.
In the previous decade, inflation arose mostly because of domestic factors (supply
usually outstripped by demand), but now the situation is different. Today's inflation
is wrought largely by global forces. Imbalances in the global economy have led
many countries, to engage in `competitive devaluation' of their currencies to gain
access to markets like the US. Central banks foster accumulation of foreign
exchange, notably the US dollar at the expense of home currencies. This artificial
undervaluation of currencies has been a significant contributor to increased global
liquidity.
Caselet 2
Read the caselet carefully and answer the following questions:
5. “Capital account convertibility (CAC) is widely regarded as one of the hallmarks of
a developed economy”. In the light of above statement, discuss the basic tenets
required for successful implementation of safe CAC. ( 7 marks)
6. ‘Following the East Asian crisis, even the most ardent votaries of CAC in the World
Bank and the IMF realized that the dangers of going in for CAC ….’ In the light of
the above statement, briefly discuss the arguments against the fuller convertibility of
rupee. ( 8 marks)
In simple language Capital account convertibility (CAC) means that it allows
anyone to freely move from local currency into foreign currency and back.
Current account convertibility allows free inflows and outflows for all purposes
other than for capital purposes such as investments and loans. In other words, it
allows residents to make and receive trade-related payments – receive dollars (or
any other foreign currency) for export of goods and services and pay dollars for
import of goods and services, make sundry remittances, access foreign currency for
travel, studies abroad, medical treatment and gifts etc. In India, current account
convertibility was established with the acceptance of the obligations under Article
VIII of the IMF’s Articles of Agreement in August 1994.
Contrary to general belief, CAC can coexist with restrictions other than on external
payments. It does not preclude the imposition of any monetary/fiscal measures
relating to forex transactions that may be warranted from a prudential point of view.
CAC is widely regarded as one of the hallmarks of a developed economy. It is also
seen as a major comfort factor for overseas investors since they know that anytime
they change their mind they will be able to re-convert local currency back into
foreign currency and take out their money. In a bid to attract foreign investment,
many developing countries went in for CAC in the 80s not realizing that free
mobility of capital leaves countries open to both sudden and huge inflows as well as
outflows, both of which can be potentially destabilizing. More important, that unless
you have the institutions, particularly financial institutions, capable of dealing with
such huge flows countries may just not be able to cope as was demonstrated by the
East Asian crisis of the late nineties.
The East Asian experience made the monetary authorities to move slowly but
cautiously towards CAC with priority being accorded to fiscal consolidation and
financial sector reform above all else.
In India, the Tarapore committee had laid down a three-year road-map ending 1999-
2000 for CAC. It also cautioned that this time-frame could be speeded up or delayed
depending on the success achieved in establishing certain pre-conditions-primarily
fiscal consolidation, strengthening of the financial system and a low rate of
inflation.
Convertibility of capital for non-residents has been a basic tenet of India’s foreign
investment policy all along, subject of course to fairly cumbersome administrative
procedures. It is only residents – both individuals as well as corporates – who
continue to be subject to capital controls. However, as part of the liberalization
process the government has over the years been relaxing these controls. Thus, a few
years ago, residents were allowed to invest through the mutual fund route and
corporates to invest in companies abroad but within fairly conservative limits.
Buoyed by the very comfortable build-up of forex reserves, the strong GDP growth
figures and the fact that progressive relaxations on current account transactions have
not lead to any flight of capital, the government announced further relaxations on
the kind and quantum of investments that can be made by residents abroad.
Section C : Applied Theory (20 Marks)
• This section consists of questions with serial number 7 - 8.
• Answer all questions.
• Marks are indicated against each question.
• Do not spend more than 25 - 30 minutes on Section C.
7. Multinational companies will have multiple divisions in different countries.
Each of the division is exposed to different cash positions, receivables and
payables in different currencies. What is the technique used by the MNCs for a
better cash management? Discuss its advantages and disadvantages in brief. ( 10 marks)
8. Write short notes on:
a. The mechanism of Letter of Credit and the limitations of Letter of Credit. ( 5 marks)
b. Post-shipment credit. ( 5 marks)
Section A : Basic Concepts
Answer Reason
1. C Import licenses for import of goods are issued for CIF value.
2. B External hedging techniques are the ones which do not form part of the day-to-day
activities .Viewed against the above, exposure netting being done on a continous basis
is an internal technique whereas all others form external techniques in which external
parties are involved.
3. D The exchange rates under floating exchange rate system are determined by the
demand and supply position for the currencies in the foreign exchange market.
4. E Dumping means selling the goods below the cost.
5. A The banker who considers the bid rate of Rs.48.75, loads a margin of 0.15% on the
rate. The margin of 0.15% is deducted from the bid rate.
48.75
Less: Margin at 0.15% 0.07
Rs.48.68
The rate quoted by the banker is Rs.48.68.
6. D Absolute form of purchasing power parity refers to the law of One Price.
7. C Ex Works means that the seller has delivered if he places the goods at the disposal of
the buyer at the seller’s premises or any other named place (works, factory,
warehouse, etc.)
8. C For BOP compilation India follows the principles laid down by the IMF manual.
9. D A current account surplus implies that a country is not consuming as much it is
producing, or in other words, is living below its means. While this type situation is
may be beneficial to a developed country, a developing country already facing
scarcity of resources can hardly afford not to consume what it is capable of
producing. Instead, a developing country would need to borrow from outside to buildup
it productive capabilities in order to achieve high rates growth. Hence, option (d)
is true and correct answer. All other statements are false.
10. A (Rs./£)bid = (Rs./€)bid  (€/£)bid
= 62.361.1761= 73.34
(Rs./Euro)ask = (Rs./€)ask  (Rs./€)ask
= 62.381.1763 =73.38
Rs./Euro = 73.34/38
11. C If there are no barriers to trade among the member countries and the external barriers
for non-members are also common, then this form of trading block falls under
customs union.
12. C In outright forward contracts the future date can be any date beyond two business
days (spot).
13. D Bank of Misr (BOM), Cairo is having an euro currency account with Commerz Bank,
Frankfut. When Citizens Bank of Canada, Vancouver refers to this account of BOM,
while corresponding with Commerz Bank, Frankfurt, it would refer as Loro account.
Loro account means “their account with you”.
14. E Economic exposure can be managed by the techniques, market selection and product
mix.
15.
B
2 0.03
1
4
    
  =
2 1 0.05
1 1.2788
S 4
     
 
= $1.2915/€.
16. D An exporter has to submit all the shipping documents evidencing export, to an
Authorized Dealer within 21 days from the date of shipment.
17. E A revocable letter of credit is one which can be canceled or revoked by the issuing
bank at the request of the applicant without the consent of the beneficiary.
18. D Packing credit is a Pre-shipment credit. Pre-shipment credit is given to the exporter to
purchase/process the raw materials and export the finished goods. Credit extended to
the exporters, prior to the shipment of goods is called Pre-shipment credit Postshipment
credit is the credit given to the exporter after the shipment of goods. All
options under (a), (b) (c) and (e) are the examples of post shipment credit. Hence the
correct answer is (d).
19. D In the case of direct quote, the principle followed is “Buy low – sell high”. Hence the
exchange margin is to be deducted from the bid rate and added to the ask rate.
20. E The annualized percentage discount on dollar for 3 months
=
mid mid
mid
Forward(A/B) -Spot(A/B)
Spot(A/B)
=
45.76 45.78 45.98 45.99
2 2
45.98 45.99
2
          
   
  
 
  =
45.770 45.985 12
100
45.985 3

 
= 1.87%
21. D International Product Life Cycle (IPLC) theory, given by Vernon, explain the various
stages in the life of a new product and the resultant international trade. The important
principles of this theory are:
• New products are developed as a result of technological innovations.
• Trade patterns are determined by the market structure and the phase in a new
product’s life.
22. C The exposure that arises from the need to convert values of assets and liabilities
denominated in a foreign currency into the domestic currency is called translation
exposure.
23. D Dollar denominated bonds issued in the US domestic markets by non-US companies
are known as
‘Yankee bond’.
24. B Though the outflows or inflows of capital are short term, they are still recorded in the
capital account.
25. B 50000000
45.90 = $10,89,325.
26. D Statements in options (a), (b), (c) and (e) are correct. It is incorrect that IFC insists on
government guarantee for financing projects. In fact IFC does not insist on
government guarantee. Correct answer is (d).
27. A In the currency board system, the board does not have any discretionary powers over
the monetary policy; the interest rates are automatically set by the market mechanism.
Options (b), (c), (d) and (e) are not true.
28. B Foreign exchange for import payment can be sold to by Authorized Dealer only to
persons resident in India. For this purpose, persons, companies or other organizations
resident in Nepal and Bhutan should be treated as Non-resident. All other options are
true.
29. B If a country has a balance of payments surplus and the Central Bank is following
floating exchange rate system, then the foreign exchange rate for its currency would
rise. As a result of this exports would decrease and its imports would increase.
30. C Buffer Stock Financing Facility introduced in 1969, this scheme provides for
countries receiving financial assistance from IMF in order to purchase approved
primary products. This help is extended to prevent countries from suffering due to
price shocks.
International Management – I (MB3G2IB) : January 2009
Section B : Problems/Caselets
1. i. Forward cover:
Bank will pay at forward buying rate and collects interest for 180 days at 8.5%. The amount
receivable by the exporter after recovery of interest is:
1,00,000 at Rs.48.90 = Rs.48,90,000
Less interest for 180 days at 8.5%
4890000x 0.085×180
365
= 2,04,978
Rupee amount payable by the Bank = 46,85,022
ii. Money market cover:
Borrow US$ at 4% and the US $ receivables after 180 days will be utilized to clear the loan
with interest. The amount of US$ that can be borrowed today so that it becomes equal to
the bill amount after 180 days.
100000
= . 98066
0.04 180
1+
365

  
 
 
98065 55
Get this amount converted at spot rate that is 98066  48.60 = Rs.47,66,008
The money market cover generates more inflow of rupees.
2. If the company can invest in home currency DKr at 5.40%, or invest in US$ 3.20%, euro at
5.10% and £ at 6.20% for 6 months.
I. Investment in DKr
DKr 20,000,000 
0.05400
1
2
  
 
  = 20,540,000
Return after 6 months = 20,540,000 – 20,000,000
= DKr 540,000
II. Investment in US$
Surplus of DKr 20 million is to be converted into US dollars at Dkr/US$ spot ask rate
4.7966 and is invested in US dollars at 3.20% for 6 months. The amount receivable in US $
together with interest is converted into DKr by covering at 6 month forward rate.
$ received at spot = 20,000,000 / 4.7966
= 4,169,620
Amount to be invested in US$ = 4,169,620
US$ 4,169,620 invested at 3.20% for 6 months, the amount receivable after 6 months
together with interest
= 4,169,620 
0.0320
1
2
  
 
 
= $ 4,236,333.92 ≈ $ 4,236,334
Convert into DKr at 6 months forward buying rate of 4.8436
= 4,236,334  4.8436 = DKr 20,519.107.36 ≈ DKr 20,519,107
Return after 6 months = DKr 20,519,107 - 20,000,000 =DKr 519,107.
IV. Investment in £
DKr20,000,000 is to be converted into £ at DKr/ £ spot ask rate ,
using synthetic quote
Spot (DKr / £)bid = (DKr /US$)bid x (US$ / £)bid = 4.7960 × 1.9639 = 9.4189
Spot (DKr / £)ask = (DKr /US$)ask x (US$ / £)ask = 4.7966 × 1.9642 = 9.4215
6 Months Forward (DKr / £)bid =6 Months FW (DKr /US$)bid x (US$ / £)bid = 4.8436 ×
1.9495 = 9.4426
6 Months Forward (DKr / £)ask =6 Months FW (DKr /US$)ask x (US$ / £)ask = 4.8442 ×
1.9497=9.4447
20,000,000 / 9.4215 = £2,122,804.42 ≈£2,122,804
£2,122,804 invested at 6.20% for 6 months will fetch = £2,122,804 x
0.0620
1
2
  
 
 
=£2,188,610.92 ≈ £2,188,611
£2,188,611 converted into £ at 6 months forward bid rate DKr 9.4426/£
= £2,188,611 x 9.4426 = DKr 20,666,178.23 ≈ 20,666,178
Return after 3 months = 20,666,178 – 20,000,000 =DKr 666,178
Return on investment in DKr =DKr 540,000
Return on investment in US$ = DKr 519,107
Return on investment in £ = DKr 666,178
The company should invest in £, since the return in investment is more when compared to
the others.
3. The US economy because of its size, purchasing power and productive output, is a powerful
force in world trade. A slowdown in US is bound to generate global ripples. But the US is a part,
not the entirety of the global economy. For years, the US has been importing deflation to its
shores from surplus labor markets such as India and China. Now that indigenous inflation has
risen in those markets, the economic utility has changed.
• The earlier theory of Asia and other emerging nation growth being delinked from a US
recession has failed. In fact, Asia and other emerging nations have been affected by a US
led recession. So far, the US recession has not had a major impact on commodities
consumption outside of the US, and rather, the big fear seems to be inflation, more
specifically, rising energy and food prices.
• Emerging market economies, where spiraling food and energy prices make up a larger
component of the CPI, are most at risk of `overheating' and might use tighter monetary
policy as a balance. The full effect of the US recession could make for a period of much
slower growth for the world economy in the coming few years.
• Global inflation has risen mainly due to unstoppable rise in crude oil prices and sharp rise
in food prices. Global central banks have to choose between inflation and growth. The US
Federal Reserve has chosen growth while the European Central Bank, the Reserve Bank of
India, Chinese Central Bank and other central banks have give preference to inflation in
their monetary policy decisions. Inflation rise may not overheat the global economy in the
short-term. In the long-term, crude oil prices will be the key. As and when crude oil prices
fall sharply for a sustained period of time global economy will overheat. If US economy
moves away from recession, India and Chinese growth rates will soar and global growth
rates will rise sharply which could overheat the global economy. Everything will depend on
how the quickly the world emerges from the energy price shock and food price shock it is
experiencing.
• The increase in energy and commodity prices across the globe, represent a durable relative
price shift, reflecting long-lasting global demand and supply trends. Commodity prices, by
nature, are cyclical so there's likely to be price shifts in the future. New technology can
create alternative products or increase productive capacity. Consumptive patterns, too, can
change. The acute investment demand for commodities, as well, may wane when the
equities and debt markets stabilize. All that, of course, takes time.
• At least 15% of the rise in energy prices and commodity prices is due to investment
interest. Long-term fundamentals are bullish due to supply constraints and ever rising
demand. Nearly 50% of the world is urbanized and is on the rise with passing of each day.
Greater urbanization will result in continuous rise in demand for energy and other
commodities. Supply constraints are bound to persist. There is lack of new discovery in
crude oil. Global warming has started affecting crop production globally. Australia, US,
Ukraine the key major producers of wheat have been affected due to weather constraints.
Further, greater land use for bio fuels has reduced area under cultivation of essential food
crops in US and other nations. There is a durable relative price shift, reflecting long-lasting
global demand and supply trends. However, in the next two to three years apart from
fundamentals, investment interest will be the key for energy prices and commodity prices.
In the previous decade, inflation arose mostly because of domestic factors (supply usually
outstripped by demand), but now the situation is different. Today's inflation is wrought largely by
global forces. International farm prices have risen because of supply pinches in the Australian
and Brazilian growing regions. That's rippled through to the Indian market.
4. Measures taken by the monetary authorities to control inflation in India:
• The government has banned commodity trading in certain commodities (like wheat, tur,
rice, urad, etc.) and cracking down on the hoarders who are trying to create an artificial
supply shortage and rise in these commodities due to supply constraints. Now further bans
are being considered.
• The government is giving subsidy on petrol, diesel, LPG and kerosene prices. There are
various pro poor schemes which include the use of public distribution schemes (PDS) to
distribute wheat, sugar at lower rates. Crude oil prices are over $130 a barrel. If the
government does not give subsidies Indian petrol, diesel and LPG prices need to rise over
20% which will result in a double digit rise in inflation. Excise duty, other central and state
levies are over 20% in petrol and diesel prices. The government should first reduce the
indirect tax element in petrol and diesel to curb inflation.
• Giving subsidy and encouraging innovations in financial markets are two separate things.
Encouraging innovations in financial markets can be done by a clear cut policy guidelines
in every financial instrument. These guidelines should not change overnight as per the
convenience of the government
The long-term measures to enhance the supply and curtail energy prices are:
The small farmer should get the real benefit of higher prices. Unless the small farmer gets a
major portion of the price rise, food security will never be attained.
• A large section of the small farmer still takes loans from the local money lender at
unreasonably high rates only to become landless later on. The government should promote
microfinance schemes so that the small farmer goes to the state run banks for all his needs
and not get caught in the Web of the local moneylender.
• Private insurance companies should be allowed to enter to crop insurance sector.
• Limit the city growth so that the growth in city does not take over agricultural land.
Increasing the number of floors will reduce the pace of urbanization.
• Population needs to be checked. Unless population growth is not checked, all the measures
will be useless at some point.
• Easy access of modern seeds and other technology to small-and- medium-sized farmers.
• It's time for the government to consider targeting inflation's root cause and revalue the
rupee upward while simultaneously addressing supply side constraints. Since much of the
world trade is denominated in the US dollars, a stronger rupee would lower the purchase
price of commodities.
• Ethanol blending with petrol is getting delayed. The government should cover the entire
country with ethanol blending as early as possible.
• Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) is yet to be implemented in the whole of India.
• Promoting alternate energy by tapping solar energy hither to untapped. The government
should use a combination of subsidy and tax incentives to promote solar energy.
• Energy efficiency norms implementation is increased along with greater supervision at
ground level, the pace of rise of energy demand will come down.
The most important effect of the unilateral increases in oil, refined products, and natural gas
prices is using the market mechanism to force consumers to ration their demand.
5. The basic requirements for a safe CAC are as follows:
Banking and capital market regulatory system
Many Indian banks are under-capitalized, and their balance sheets characterized by large
amounts of Non-Performing Assets (NPAs). This is not a welcome sign as banks intermediate a
good amount of funds in India and about 64% of the total financial assets belong to the banks.
Capital account convertibility requires flexibility, dynamism and foresight in the banking and
financial institutions. Hence, unless the banking standards get a facelift to make banks
competitive it would not be advisable to shift to CAC.
Transparency and discipline in fiscal and financial policies
If the government wants to win the confidence of the investors then it has to be more transparent.
Fiscal deficit will have to be through concerted efforts from the government; otherwise, capital
flight might become a reality to reckon with.
Strong Macroeconomic Fundamentals
India's macroeconomic fundamentals are certainly better than before, but they need to firm up
more to attract the confidence of the investors. With large NPAs of the public sector banks, a
weak financial market and a heavily corrupt business environment are all points to be
considered.
Once the interest rate differentials between the different countries fade out, the flight of capital
might increase further while at the same time the inflows into the country cannot be guaranteed.
Hence, the government should attempt to increase the FDI which has the potential to promote
employment and growth, but minimize the inflow of short-term capital.
6. The various arguments against the full convertibility of rupee are as follows:
1. An open capital account could lead to the export of domestic savings, which for capital
scarce developing countries would cripple the financing of domestic investment.
2. It would weaken the ability of the authorities to tax domestic financial activities, income
and wealth.
3. Capital convertibility could expose the economy to greater macroeconomic instability
arising from the volatility of short-term capital movements, the risk of large capital
outflows and associated negative externalities.
4. Premature liberalization (that is, if the speed and sequencing of reforms are not appropriate)
could initially stimulate capital inflows that would cause real exchange rate to appreciate
and thereby destabilize an economy undergoing the fragile process of transition and
structural reform. Once stabilization program lacks credibility, currency substitution and
capital flight could trigger a BoP crisis, depreciation and spiraling inflation.
5. It is commodity convertibility rather than financial convertibility that is of the greatest
welfare significance.
6. Speculative short-term movements in the interest rates may make monetary policy
ineffective.
7. Due to higher capital inflows following capital convertibility, the appreciating real
exchange rate would divert resources from tradable to non-tradable sectors (like
construction, housing, hotels and tourism etc and this would happen in the face of rising
external liabilities (i.e., the risk of the "Dutch disease effect").
8. A convertible capital account could lead to financial bubbles, especially through irrational
exuberance of investment in real estate and equity market financed by unbridled foreign
borrowing.
9. Capital convertibility would expose the distortions in the price of borrowing from abroad
vis-à-vis the domestic market and under such circumstances private firms would borrow
more than what is socially optimal. This generally increases the cost of foreign borrowings
for all borrowers.
Section C: Applied Theory
7. MNCs will have multiple divisions/subsidiaries in different countries. Each of the subsidiary
or division will have cash positions, receivables and payables in the same currencies or
different currencies. The composition of receivables and payables and cash can be in any
combination. One division may have huge receivables in the US dollar and hedged with a
short position while another division which has a huge dollar payable, might have hedged
with a long position with the same maturity. Similarly, one division may be having a surplus
cash position while another division in another country may be having a cash deficit and
borrowing at a high cost. These type of situations warrant proper cash management systems.
To overcome these type of problems for cash management, MNCs resort to centralized cash
management system.
Advantages
i. Netting: In large MNC’s, intra-corporate transactions among various subsidiaries of the
parent company or subsidiaries with parent corporate are a common feature. As a
consequence there will be receivables and payables among the group subsidiaries
resulting in cash inflows and outflows in different currencies. At times the inflows and
outflows between two subsidiaries may have matching maturities or may have maturity
mismatches. If the receivables and payables are of different currencies, the transaction
costs can be higher.
In a centralized cash management system all cash transactions of group companies are
settled through a single point.
In such circumstances, netting is possible whereby the receivables are netted out against
payables and net cash flows are settled among the group subsidiaries.
When we are considering the transactions between the subsidiaries, leading and lagging
of receivables/ payables is possible to enable matching of maturities. Netting with other
corporate entities is also possible.
ii. Management of currency exposure: Another advantage of centralized cash
management system is exchange risk management. In a centralized cash management
system, the parent can evolve a corporate strategy for exchange risk management
keeping overall position of receivables and payables in different currencies of the various
subsidiaries in mind. This strategy will reduce the transaction cost of the hedging which
otherwise would be incurred by each subsidiary individually.
iii. Pooling of cash: Each of the subsidiary will maintain certain amount of liquid position.
Some of the subsidiaries may have surplus cash whereas some others may have a deficit.
In a centralized cash management system, the center may pool up the cash from surplus
subsidiaries for transfer to the deficit units. This will eliminate borrowing cost to the
deficit units. The existence of cash pooling center will reduce the burden of cash
management at the subsidiary level.
Disadvantages:
It is rarely possible to hold all cash in a major international financial centre. This is
because there may be unpredictable delays in moving funds from the financial center to
other countries. If an important payment is due, especially if it is to a foreign government
for taxes or to a local supplier of a crucial input, excess cash balances should be held
where they are needed, even if these mean opportunity costs in terms of higher interest
earnings available elsewhere. When the cash needs in local currencies are known well
ahead of time, arrangements can be made in advance for receiving the needed currency,
but substantial allowances for potential delay should be made.
Complete centralization of management is difficult because local representation is often
necessary for dealing with local clients and banks. Even if a multinational bank is used
for accepting receipts and making payments, problems can arise that can only be dealt
with on the spot. Therefore, the question a firm must answer is the degree of
centralization of cash management that is appropriate, and in particular which activities
can be centralized and which should be decentralized.
8. a. In order to make payment to the overseas supplier, the buyer of goods approaches his
bank for opening a letter of credit in favor of the supplier.
After considering the request of the buyer and fulfillment of the necessary formalities,
the issuing bank (i.e. the buyer’s bank) opens the letter of credit in favor of the supplier.
The letter of credit is transmitted to the advising bank (usually an intermediary
bank located in supplier’s the credit, the advising bank advises the credit to the
beneficiary (i.e. the supplier). The beneficiary verifies the letter of credit and checks for
any discrepancies vis-à-vis, the sale contract. If any discrepancies are noticed, the buyer
is asked to incorporate the necessary changes/amendments to the LC. The supplier then
proceeds to ship the goods.
Shipment of goods is followed by submission of necessary documents by the supplier to
the negotiating bank in order to obtain payment for the goods. The negotiating bank,
upon receipt of commercial documents and the bill of lading from the exporter,
scrutinizes the documents in relation to the LC and if found to be in order, negotiates the
bill and makes payment to the supplier. The negotiating bank then claims reimbursement
from the issuing bank by mailing the documents to it or any other bank authorized for the
said purpose. Disadvantages/Limitations
A letter of credit is not a cent per cent safe deal either for the exporter or for the importer.
To the exporter, the undertaking of the issuing bank is only conditional. The documents
tendered should strictly comply with the requirements of the credit. It is only the bank
that would decide if the documents are as per the terms of the credit; any slight variation
or non-fulfillment or excess detail in the documents tendered give scope for the bank to
claim that the documents are not as per the terms of the credit. Moreover, the credit does
not protect the exporter from the governmental action that may deter payment.
To the importer, the major disadvantage is that it does not ensure that he would be
receiving the goods of the specific condition and order. In letter of credit transactions, all
parties deal with documents and not in goods. He stands committed to reimburse the
issuing bank when documents as required are tendered to him. But this does not ensure
the receipt of proper goods. Though the risk is safeguarded by calling for special
documents like packing list, etc., the risk of falsification of documents still remains.
b. Pre-shipment Credit
The purpose of this credit is to provide the necessary funds to the exporter to procure raw
material and meet the costs involved in manufacturing the goods. This credit may be
initially extended without any security in which case it is known as extended packing
credit. At this stage it remains a clean advance. The funds so lent are used to procure the
raw material, which then is charged to the bank. Then the advance becomes a secured
advance. The advance is given either in the form of a loan or in the form of an operating
account. The advance so given has to be adjusted with the proceeds of the export. Hence
it is necessary to ensure that the loan given for executing a particular export order is
adjusted out of the sale proceeds of that export. However the banker is vested with the
authority by RBI to waive this condition and to allow the advance to be adjusted from
the proceeds of any export transaction.
Pre-shipment credit is extended for the period which matches with the operating cycle of
the activity. However, the period of credit is normally restricted to a maximum of 180
days. It is envisaged that the export will be materialized within the due date and the loan
will be adjusted from the export proceeds. However, the banks have the discretion to
extend the period of credit up to 360 days under special circumstances. In order to ensure
that export will materialize banks normally insist for a Letter of Credit opened in the
name of the exporter or a confirmed order
__________________
Answered By StudyChaCha Member
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