Go Back   2022-2023 StudyChaCha > StudyChaCha Discussion Forum > General Topics

  #2  
Old April 27th, 2014, 10:44 AM
Sashwat's Avatar
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Default Re: B.A course semester wise subjects

Yes sure, here I am sharing the University of Delhi B.A course Economics semester wise subject:

Semester I
Paper 01 – Introductory Microeconomics
Paper 02- Statistical Methods in Economics-I
Paper 03 - Mathematical Methods for Economics-I
Paper 04 - Concurrent – Qualifying Language

Semester II
Paper 05 – Introductory Macroeconomics
Paper 06 – Statistical Methods in Economics-II
Paper 07 - Mathematical Methods for Economics-II
Paper 08 - Concurrent – Credit Language

Semester III
Paper 09 – Intermediate Microeconomics-I
Paper 10 – Intermediate Macroeconomics-I
Paper 11 - Economic History of India: 1857-1947
Paper 12 - Introductory Econometrics
Paper 13 - Concurrent – Interdisciplinary

Semester IV
Paper 14- Intermediate Microeconomics-II
Paper 15 - Intermediate Macroeconomics-II
Paper 16 – Economy, State and Society
Paper 17 - Indian Economic Development since 1947 - I
Paper 18 - Concurrent – Discipline Centered I

Semester V
Paper 19- Indian Economic Development since 1947 - II
Paper 20 – Development Theory and Experience-I
Paper 21 – Public Economics
Paper 22 – Option -I (any one from List of Group-I) Group-I 22A - Economics of Health and Education
22B - Political Economy 22C - Topics in Microeconomics-I 22D - Advanced Macroeconomics

Semester VI
Paper 23 – International Economics
Paper 24- Development Theory and Experience-II
Paper 25- Option-II (any one from List of Group-II)
Group – II
25A - Comparative Economic Development: 1850- 1950
25B - Applied Econometrics
25C - Topics in Microeconomics-II
25D - Financial Economics
25E - Environmental Economics
Paper 26 - Concurrent – Discipline Centered II

Paper 01: INTRODUCTORY MICROECONOMICS
Course Description
This course is designed to expose first-year students, who may be new to economics, the basic
principles of microeconomic theory. The emphasis will be on thinking like an economist and the
course will illustrate how microeconomic concepts can be applied to analyse real-life situations.

Course Outline
1. Exploring the subject matter of Economics
Why study economics? The scope and method of economics; scarcity and choice; questions of
what, how and for whom to produce and how to distribute output; the basic competitive model;
prices, property rights and profits; incentives and information; rationing; opportunity sets;
economic systems; reading and working with graphs.

2. Supply and Demand: How Markets Work, Markets and Welfare
Individual demand and supply schedules and the derivation of market demand and supply; shifts
in demand and supply curves; the role prices in resource allocation; the concept of elasticity
and its application; consumer and producer surplus; taxes and their efficiency costs

3. Households
The consumption decision: preferences and their representation with indifference curves; budget
constraints; a consumer’s optimum choice; income and substitution effects; labour supply and
savings decisions.

4. Firms and Perfect Market Structure
Behaviour of profit maximizing firms and the production process; short-run costs and output
decisions; costs and output in the long run.

5. Imperfect Market Structure
Monopoly and anti-trust policy; government policies towards competition; imperfect
competition.

6. Input Markets
Labour and land markets; concepts of derived demand, input productivity and marginal revenue
product and input demand curves; competitive input markets and public policy.

Readings
1. Karl E. Case and Ray C. Fair, Principles of Economics, Pearson Education, Inc., 8th
edition, 2007.
2. N. Gregory Mankiw, Economics: Principles and Applications, India edition by South
Western, a part of Cengage Learning, Cengage Learning India Private Limited, 4th
edition, 2007.
3. Joseph E. Stiglitz and Carl E. Walsh, Economics, W.W. Norton & Company, Inc.,
New York, International Student Edition, 4th edition, 2007.

Paper 02: STATISTICAL METHODS IN ECONOMICS –I
Course Description
This is the first of a two-part sequence on statistical methods. It begins with some basic concepts
and terminology that are fundamental to statistical analysis and inference. It then develops the
notion of probability, followed by probability distributions of discrete and continuous random
variables. The semester concludes with a discussion of joint distributions.

Course Outline
1. Introduction and Overview
The distinction between populations and samples and between population parameters and sample
statistics; the use of measures of location and variation to describe and summarize data;
population moments and their sample counterparts.

2. Elementary Probability Theory
Sample spaces and events; probability axioms and properties; counting techniques; conditional
probability and Bayes’ rule; independence.

3. Random Variables and Probability Distributions
Defining random variables; probability distributions; expected values of random variables and of
functions of random variables; properties of commonly used discrete and continuous
distributions (uniform, binomial, normal, poisson and exponential random variables).

4. Random Sampling and Jointly Distributed Random Variables
Density and distribution functions for jointly distributed random variables; computing expected
values; covariance and correlation coefficients.

Readings:
1. Jay L. Devore, Probability and Statistics for Engineers, Cengage Learning, 2010.
2. John E. Freund, Mathematical Statistics, Prentice Hall, 1992.
3. Richard J. Larsen and Morris L. Marx, An Introduction to Mathematical Statistics and its
Applications, Prentice Hall, 2011.

Paper 03: MATHEMATICAL METHODS IN ECONOMICS –I
Course Description
This is the first of a compulsory two-course sequence. The objective of this sequence is to
transmit the body of basic mathematics that enables the study of economic theory at the
undergraduate level, specifically the courses on microeconomic theory, macroeconomic theory,
statistics and econometrics set out in this syllabus. In this course, particular economic models are
not the ends, but the means for illustrating the method of applying mathematical techniques to
economic theory in general. The level of sophistication at which the material is to be taught is
indicated by the contents of the prescribed textbook.

Course Outline
1. Preliminaries
Logic and proof techniques; sets and set operations; relations; functions and their properties;
number systems.

2. Functions of one real variable
Graphs; elementary types of functions: quadratic, polynomial, power, exponential, logarithmic;
sequences and series: convergence, algebraic properties and applications; continuous functions:
characterizations, properties with respect to various operations and applications; differentiable
functions: characterizations, properties with respect to various operations and applications;
second and higher order derivatives: properties and applications.

3. Single-variable optimization
Geometric properties of functions: convex functions, their characterizations and applications;
local and global optima: geometric characterizations, characterizations using calculus and
applications.

4. Integration of functions
Areas under curves; indefinite integrals; the definite integral.

5. Difference equations
First order difference equations.
Readings:
K. Sydsaeter and P. Hammond, Mathematics for Economic Analysis, Pearson Educational
Asia, Delhi, 2002.

PAPER 04
CONCURRENT - QUALIFYING
LANGUAGE
Paper 05: INTRODUCTORY MACROECONOMICS
Course Description
This course aims to introduce the first year students to the basic concepts of macroeconomics.
Macroeconomics deals with the aggregate economy. This course discusses the preliminary
concepts associated with the determination and measurement of aggregate macroeconomic
variable like savings, investment, GDP, money, inflation, and the balance of payments.

Course Outline
1. Introduction to Macroeconomics and National Income Accounting
Basic issues studied in macroeconomics; measurement of gross domestic product; income,
expenditure and the circular flow; real versus nominal GDP; price indices; national income
accounting for an open economy; balance of payments: current and capital accounts.

2. Money
Functions of money; quantity theory of money; determination of money supply and demand;
credit creation; tools of monetary policy.

3. Inflation
Inflation and its social costs; hyperinflation.

4. The Closed Economy in the Short Run
Classical and Keynesian systems; simple Keynesian model of income determination; IS-LM
model; fiscal and monetary multipliers.

Readings:
1. Dornbusch, Fischer and Startz, Macroeconomics, McGraw Hill, 11th edition, 2010.
2. N. Gregory Mankiw. Macroeconomics, Worth Publishers, 7th edition, 2010.
3. Olivier Blanchard, Macroeconomics, Pearson Education, Inc., 5th edition, 2009.
4. Richard T. Froyen, Macroeconomics, Pearson Education Asia, 2nd edition, 2005.
5. Andrew B. Abel and Ben S. Bernanke, Macroeconomics, Pearson Education, Inc.,
7th edition, 2011.
6. Errol D’Souza, Macroeconomics, Pearson Education, 2009.
7. Paul R. Krugman, Maurice Obstfeld and Marc Melitz, International Economics,
Pearson Education Asia, 9th edition, 2012.

Paper 06: STATISTICAL METHODS IN ECONOMICS - II
Course Description
This is the second course in the two part sequence on statistical methods. It begins with a
discussion on sampling techniques used to collect survey data. It introduces the notion of
sampling distributions that act as a bridge between probability theory and statistical inference. It
then covers topics in inference that include point estimation, statistical intervals and hypothesis
testing. It concludes with a discussion of the simple linear regression model.

Course Outline
1. Sampling
Principal steps in a sample survey; methods of sampling; the role of sampling theory; properties
of random samples.

2. Point and Interval Estimation
Estimation of population parameters using methods of moments and maximum likelihood
procedures; properties of estimators; confidence intervals for population parameters.

3. Hypothesis Testing
Defining statistical hypotheses; distributions of test statistics; testing hypotheses related to
population parameters; Type I and Type II errors; power of a test; tests for comparing parameters
from two samples.

4. Simple Linear Regression
Estimation of the slope and intercept parameters; inference and prediction.
Readings:
1. Jay L. Devore, Probability and Statistics for Engineers, Cengage Learning, 2010.
2. William G. Cochran, Sampling Techniques, John Wiley, 2007.
3. Richard J. Larsen and Morris L. Marx, An Introduction to Mathematical Statistics and its
Applications, Prentice Hall, 2011.

Paper 07: MATHEMATICAL METHODS IN ECONOMICS - II
Course Description
This course is the second part of a compulsory two-course sequence. This part is to be taught in
Semester II following the first part in Semester I. The first course covered single variable
functions and optimization and this course covers the essentials of linear algebra and
optimization techniques required for the analysis of functions of several variables that are
commonly used in economics.

Course Outline
1. Differential equations
First-order differential equations; integral curve, direction diagram and slope field; qualitative
theory and stability.

2. Linear algebra
Vector spaces: algebraic and geometric properties, scalar products, norms, orthogonality; linear
transformations: properties, matrix representations and elementary operations; systems of linear
equations: properties of their solution sets; determinants: characterization, properties and
applications.

3. Functions of several real variables
Geometric representations: graphs and level curves; differentiable functions: characterizations,
properties with respect to various operations and applications; second order derivatives:
properties and applications; the implicit function theorem, and application to comparative statics
problems; homogeneous and homothetic functions: characterizations and applications.

4. Multi-variable optimization
Convex sets; geometric properties of functions: convex functions, their characterizations,
properties and applications; further geometric properties of functions: quasiconvex functions,
their characterizations, properties and applications; unconstrained optimization: geometric
characterizations, characterizations using calculus and applications; constrained optimization
with equality constraints: geometric characterizations, Lagrange characterization using calculus
and applications; properties of value function: envelope theorem and applications.
Readings:

K. Sydsaeter and P. Hammond, Mathematics for Economic Analysis, Pearson Educational
Asia, Delhi, 2002.

For complete syllabus click on the attachment given below:

Address
Delhi University Ground, Mukherjee Nagar
New Delhi, Delhi, India ‎
Attached Files Available for Download
File Type: pdf University of Delhi B.A course Economics semester wise subjects.pdf (161.5 KB, 20 views)
__________________
Answered By StudyChaCha Member
Reply With Quote
Reply


Reply to this Question / Ask Another Question
Your Username: Click here to log in

Message:
Options



All times are GMT +6. The time now is 04:57 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2023, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8